Talk:Cisco Systems

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More talk[edit]

Another source says, "To begin with, Cisco was a garage company run by a married couple. They sold their shares at a relatively early stage, and missed out on billions, although they are still massively well off."


Storing the above here, pending verification by GayCommunist who is probably right for all I know. --Ed Poor


The story is factual as far as I know. I read about it in Newsweek somewhere, and at one point saw a TV documentary about the company. The couple began making simple WAN routers for university campuses (they were among the first to come up with the idea), and expanded very rapidly. There is a hillarious video tape of them making a sales pitch in their garage, when an earthquake hits. They were forced out of the administration once the company got really large, and sold their shares in disgust. The company continued to grow, so it turns out they lost billions (I think they were left with about one billion dollars). The wife runs a chain of floral shops today. User:GayCommunist

Here's some backing: [1]

Thanks, here's a key excerpt:

Sandra Lerner ... With Leonard Bosack, she founded Cisco Systems (1996 revenues: $5.4 billion), one of Silicon Valley's biggest success stories. They created the first commercially successful router, a device that enables once-incompatible computers in far-off computer networks to communicate. In 1990 they walked away with $170 million after being booted by the professional managers the firm's venture capitalists brought in. [2]

Dates format in article[edit]

There seems to be some concern over the date formatting in this article recently. I wanted to note some article facts from my content search and then we can discuss what the WP:MOSDATE policy recommends from here. I may be off by a few percent, but I believe it is accurate enough for the purpose of this discussion. Anyone is welcome to double check my numbers and correct any errors they see.

Date formats in Cisco Systems
Format Main
article
Footnotes
YYYY-MM-DD 0 131
Month DD, YYYY
Month YYYY
DD Month YYYY
Total w/Month
11
6
1
18
28
5
6
39

From here we see there is clearly a mixture of date formats.

  • The first full date added to the article was one on October 30, 2006. It also included a footnote. The date format of that body copy and footnote entry were both Month, DD, YYYY. Before this entry there were a number of Month YYYY entries as well.
  • On January 25, 2007, a user took the external reference links already present and entered them into the article as references and used the YYYY-MM-DD format.

I will now switch to comments based on my opinion.

  1. The way I read WP:DATERET "The date format chosen by the first major contributor in the early stages of an article should continue to be used, unless there is reason to change it based on strong national ties to the topic." I suppose we can argue if the first person to add the full date in Oct 2006 was a major contributor or not, but the first full date in the article for both the body and footnote used Month DD, YYYY.
  2. Based on those facts I believe the article started with Month DD, YYY and should retain that format.

§ Music Sorter § (talk) 08:56, 11 July 2011 (UTC)

Proposed merger of American Internet[edit]

American Internet doesn't appear to meet the notability guidelines for organizations. However, information in the article would have some use in this article. Therefore, I would like to propose that the article be merged here. Alpha_Quadrant (talk) 23:24, 2 November 2011 (UTC)

I have merged to Cisco Network Registrar. That seemed like a more appropriate destination based on the contents of the source article. --Kvng (talk) 17:02, 6 November 2011 (UTC)

some history about bridges[edit]

It's late and i am tired so some ideas and info for others to research and then add to the main article. I am writing this from memory and this stuff is 20 yrs old or more so it needs checking and cannot be used as is. The original logo used to be a red bridge like the bridge in san fransisco. The logos used to be everywhere. Their current logo is still based on a bridge. Bridge is a network term for joining two networks and the first networking device that made cisco famous was a bridge. networks used to be joined with hubs but they get too busy if you do that. Bridges join networks but learn addresses for both sides of the bridge (mac address) When lots of bridges are shoved into a single box you get a switch and almost nobody uses hubs nowadays. When i was a student at university they used cisco bridges on the long corridors instead of packet relay devices because the bridges were cheap, and the campus was too large. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Scottonsocks (talkcontribs) 22:31, 10 May 2012 (UTC)

Founding date[edit]

The opening sentence reads "Cisco Systems was founded in December 1924 ..." really? Leonard Bosack wasn't even born then ... Guess it needs editing then? Julie