Talk:Computer virus

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Note: revisions of this article between June 28 and September 11, 2002 are at Virus (computing).

References[edit]

BRAIN Virus[edit]

Second reference for BRAIN Virus. This video is in English. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnedOWfPKT0

V.I.R.U.S. - Vital Information Resource Under Siege[edit]

Hello people, someone told me that virus means Vital Information Resource Under Siege. Is this true? Any comment is appreciated. :) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Atommaster4 (talkcontribs) 10:07, 11 May 2013 (UTC)

No. Well, that could be defined as an acronym, but the term for a computer virus is taken from biology for a virus that causes disease, because computer viruses spread in a way similar to biological viruses and make computers sick, similar to biological viruses making organisms sick. The word is originally from Greek and means poison.

Robert McClenon (talk) 17:01, 11 May 2013 (UTC)

Well known "backronym", a made up construction supposedly accounting for the name, but this supposed acronym did not appear until well over a decade after the term virus was in common use for computer viruses. The point about viruses, in biological terms, is that they require a host in order to reproduce, unlike other organisms like bacteria that reproduce independently. Computer viruses reproduce and spread by subverting some other computer program (not necessarily an executable file) and do not reproduce on their own (by definition). Incidentally, this V.I.R.U.S. nonsense comes up in here repeatedly, and is repeatedly debunked, but the automatic archiving of the talk pages repeatedly removes the discussion so the whole farrago has to be repeated over and over. TheNameWithNoMan (talk) 15:26, 23 June 2013 (UTC)
Exactly. A stupid "backronym" that won't go away. As TheNameWithNoMan points out, a computer virus requires an automated host to reproduce, just as a biological virus requires a biological host to reproduce, and both cause undesirable symptoms (disease). Strict usage distinguishes viruses, which require a host, from other malware, such as worms, that may reproduce independently (like bacteria) and Trojan horses, that do not reproduce (although they may carry other malware that does reproduce). (The original Trojan horse, of course, was really a troop carrier.) Robert McClenon (talk) 16:24, 23 June 2013 (UTC)

Add to top[edit]

Hello. I request that at the top of the page, you add this with the list of viruses: Rouge security software. I appreciate if you do. 98.116.179.22 (talk) 18:51, 18 July 2013 (UTC)

Recent change to intro/definition[edit]

This describes only one type of virus, the file infecter. Many viruses don't infect files at all. Some of the most successful of the early viruses were those that infected the boot sectors of floppy disks, or the boot or partition sectors of hard disks. Others seemed to infect files, but made no change to the file at all, instead spoofing the filing system to load the virus code from another location before running the intended executable file. The previous definition was carefully crafted to include all the types of virus. The current one is just wrong. — Preceding unsigned comment added by TheNameWithNoMan (talkcontribs) 23:14, 25 July 2013 (UTC)

So my edit to include non-file programs has been reverted by Mesoderm. Would he care to explain which file is infected by Brain, one of the very first computer viruses and the first to be widespread in the real world? Or Michelangelo, another famous early virus? TheNameWithNoMan (talk) 19:12, 7 August 2013 (UTC)

Category deletions[edit]

Please delete pig Malware. pig Computer viruses is already a subcat of Malware and having both the article and the subcat there is redundant clutter. Please delete cat Internet security. Everyone likes to be associated with the internet, but this article is general, not internet specific, and will be found in the appropriate categories by those interested. thanks, 50.136.247.190 (talk) 00:52, 1 September 2013 (UTC)

Mac virus found in the wild[edit]

This sentence is no longer accurate and should be deleted or changed.

"There are no known viruses that have spread "in the wild" for Mac OS X."

[1] ABC report on the Flashback virus

"The vast majority of viruses (over 99%) target systems running Microsoft Windows, "[edit]

I have read the 3 references cited for this claim and can't find a statistic for 99% of viruses being Windows, let alone a reliable one. Can someone please double check this for me? If it's not there then we can remove it. Yes, Most viruses are Windows, but having a statistic with no fact behind it is no good way of getting this point across. 85.255.235.18 (talk) 16:31, 2 February 2014 (UTC)

I've removed the statistic. Two of the sources seem not to have it. There's one I can't check but it's too old to be reliable. --Lo2u (TC) 08:52, 22 April 2014 (UTC)

Article has biases/lacks essential information[edit]

While reading this article, I couldn't help but think that the contributors were mainly Linux/Mac users because of the blatant disregard for impartiality.

Although it is true that Windows machines are most infected, that does not mean this is solely because of design flaws as the reader of this article would conclude.

There has to be an emphasis on the massive number of persons using Windows clients and how this plays a factor in viruses being made to affect most users. Furthermore, there was no mention in this article as to how to evade viruses and use safe practices to avoid infection. As I read this article, it came across that the contributors were insinuating that if one were to use a Windows machine, it is guaranteed one would be prone to getting a virus.

Instead of focusing on loyalties to operating systems, and preferences, this article should focus on the facts. Facts such as that if one uses a Windows PC with a bit of common sense and employs safe practices (e.g., not opening files from unknown senders, not swapping flash drives from machine to machine, keeping the machine updated, avoiding sketchy sites, avoiding "free" downloads, not installing pirated software, etc.) it is actually very uncommon to get a virus.

The tidbit on Apple using "the fact that Windows machines get more viruses" as a ploy for advertising should be removed as many of Apple's advertising techniques play on misconceptions and untruths.

Lastly, a section or a redirect on how to avoid virus infection should be added. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Polancox (talkcontribs) 18:34, 20 May 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2012/04/mac-os-x-report-virus-infects-600000-computers/