Talk:Doughnut

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British origin needs better sourcing[edit]

The last paragraph of the "Possible Origins" section makes the claim that the doughnut is of British origin. However, it cites only two sources: An article from the Daily Mail (a British tabloid), and a very short fluff piece from Fox News. The Daily Mail is not, to my knowledge, a reliable source, and the Fox News article is lacking. I would like to see better sourcing for that paragraph, or if better sourcing cannot be found it should probably be excised altogether. For now, I've added "unreliable source" and "needs verification" tags to the appropriate articles until the matter is addressed. - Bardbom (talk) 05:12, 18 October 2014 (UTC)

8,000 years old[edit]

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/05/dining/doughnuts-in-new-york-city-from-carpe-donut-nyc-to-pies-n-thighs.html
Rings Around the City
By LIGAYA MISHANNOV.
New York Times
Nov. 4, 2014
Its pleasures are prehistoric — fossilized ring-shaped cakes have been unearthed, dating back 8,000 years — and democratic. Free doughnuts were handed to the huddled arrivals at Ellis Island, to lines of hollow-cheeked men during the Great Depression and to soldiers on the battlefields of the First World War, by Salvation Army volunteers who requisitioned helmets as deep fryers and punched holes with spent artillery shells.
In New York City, the doughnut no longer resembles the Dutch olykoek that Anna Joralemon started selling in 1673 from a shop on lower Broadway.
--Nbauman (talk) 01:50, 5 November 2014 (UTC)

"Two types of doughnuts" in lede[edit]

The lede says the two types of doughnuts are with and without hole (without any citation of course). Isn't a more significant distinction that between cake and risen doughnuts? Mmyers1976 (talk) 21:42, 2 January 2015 (UTC)

non holed doughnut earlier in germany[edit]

ther germern wikipedia article has an earlier date see http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berliner_Pfannkuchen#Herkunft any one interested in fixing this oversight in english page see also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berliner_(doughnut) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.174.137.238 (talk) 03:11, 12 February 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 27 April 2015[edit]



John Davidheiser, Manager, Creative Services, Yum Yum / Winchell's Donuts JohnD@YumYumDonuts.com

Winchell's Donut House began in 1948, two years before Dunkin. Mr. Verne H. Winchell chose the spelling, "donut" for economy of price and space on signage. This according to our own, Mel Allison, who worked closely with Mr. Winchell and has been with the company since January, 1960. I can submit a photo of our 1948 store with the "donut" spelling.


Article should be changed to:

Winchell's Donut House, is the oldest surviving company to use the donut variation. Mr. Verne H. Winchell chose the spelling, "donut" for economy of price and space on signage.

...other chains, such as the defunct Mayflower Doughnut Corporation (1931), did not use that spelling.[20] According to the Oxford Dictionary while “doughnut” is used internationally, the spelling “donut” is American.[21] The spelling “donut” remained rare until the 1950s, and has since grown significantly in popularity;[22] this growth in use has possibly been influenced by the spread of Dunkin’ Donuts.[23]


65.60.112.178 (talk) 22:18, 27 April 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. Also, please be aware of our original research and neutral point of view policies. --I am k6ka Talk to me! See what I have done 22:46, 27 April 2015 (UTC)