Talk:Doughnut

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I found a reliable source[edit]

I found an RS. If anyone wants to use it, I'll put it here:

http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=_W7_ZdXKHt0C&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=Doughnut+dessert&ots=bFgBGEGcnF&sig=0ys3wSm3A1d-XyegxbWPYiv0Spc#v=onepage&q=Doughnut%20dessert&f=false


Semi-protected edit request on 8 October 2014[edit]

The Section about doughnut holes is redundant. I would suggest revising it as follows:

Doughnut holes are small, bite-sized doughnuts that were traditionally made from the dough taken from the center of ring doughnuts. Before long, doughnut sellers saw the opportunity to market "holes" as a novelty and many chains offer their own variety, some with their own brand names such as "Munchkins" from Dunkin' Donuts and "Timbits" from Tim Hortons.

Traditionally, doughnut holes are made by frying the dough removed from the center portion of the doughnut. Consequently, they are considerably smaller than a standard doughnut and tend to be spherical. Similar to standard doughnuts, doughnut holes may be topped with confections, such as glaze or powdered sugar.

Originally, most varieties of doughnut holes were derivatives of their ring doughnut (yeast-based dough or cake batter) counterparts. However, doughnut holes can also be made by dropping a small ball of dough into hot oil from a specially shaped nozzle or cutter.[1] This production method has allowed doughnut sellers to produce bite-sized versions of non-ring doughnuts, such as filled doughnuts, fritters and Dutchies. 206.177.43.70 (talk) 18:48, 8 October 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Thanks, NiciVampireHeart 16:05, 9 October 2014 (UTC)

British origin needs better sourcing[edit]

The last paragraph of the "Possible Origins" section makes the claim that the doughnut is of British origin. However, it cites only two sources: An article from the Daily Mail (a British tabloid), and a very short fluff piece from Fox News. The Daily Mail is not, to my knowledge, a reliable source, and the Fox News article is lacking. I would like to see better sourcing for that paragraph, or if better sourcing cannot be found it should probably be excised altogether. For now, I've added "unreliable source" and "needs verification" tags to the appropriate articles until the matter is addressed. - Bardbom (talk) 05:12, 18 October 2014 (UTC)

8,000 years old[edit]

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/05/dining/doughnuts-in-new-york-city-from-carpe-donut-nyc-to-pies-n-thighs.html
Rings Around the City
By LIGAYA MISHANNOV.
New York Times
Nov. 4, 2014
Its pleasures are prehistoric — fossilized ring-shaped cakes have been unearthed, dating back 8,000 years — and democratic. Free doughnuts were handed to the huddled arrivals at Ellis Island, to lines of hollow-cheeked men during the Great Depression and to soldiers on the battlefields of the First World War, by Salvation Army volunteers who requisitioned helmets as deep fryers and punched holes with spent artillery shells.
In New York City, the doughnut no longer resembles the Dutch olykoek that Anna Joralemon started selling in 1673 from a shop on lower Broadway.
--Nbauman (talk) 01:50, 5 November 2014 (UTC)

"Two types of doughnuts" in lede[edit]

The lede says the two types of doughnuts are with and without hole (without any citation of course). Isn't a more significant distinction that between cake and risen doughnuts? Mmyers1976 (talk) 21:42, 2 January 2015 (UTC)

non holed doughnut earlier in germany[edit]

ther germern wikipedia article has an earlier date see http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berliner_Pfannkuchen#Herkunft

any one interested in fixing this oversight in english page see also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berliner_(doughnut) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.174.137.238 (talk) 03:11, 12 February 2015 (UTC)

  1. ^ "Timbit turns 35". Retrieved 18 June 2014.