Talk:Doughnut

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Edit request on December 3rd 2013 - Typo[edit]

When discussing the weight of a cake doughnut, please either use units of weight or change the wording to something along the lines of "the mass of the doughnut is...." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 137.28.144.67 (talk) 18:47, 3 December 2013 (UTC)

Northern Ireland[edit]

Doughnuts are not known as gravy rings in N.Ireland. Nor is cooking oil known as gravy. Complete nonsense. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.150.183.90 (talk) 00:51, 13 January 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 14 February 2014[edit]

Please change this:

Belgium[edit]

In Belgium, the smoutebollen are similar to the Dutch kind of oliebollen, but they usually do not contain any fruit, except for apple chunks sometimes. They are typical carnival and fair snacks and are eaten with powdered sugar on them.[1]

to this:

Belgium[edit]

In Belgium, the smoutebollen in Dutch or "croustillons" in French are similar to the Dutch kind of oliebollen, but they usually do not contain any fruit, except for apple chunks sometimes. They are typical carnival and fair snacks and are coated with powdered sugar.[2] MrScrogneugneu (talk) 13:27, 14 February 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Thanks for that - Initially, I didn't see that you had added another reference, as they were under one number, and they do not appear on talk pages. Arjayay (talk) 18:15, 17 February 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 16 May 2014[edit]

The spelling of donut is popularized by the chain dunkin' donuts and is not an alternate spelling. It is specifically associated by the company itself.

149.169.138.61 (talk) 15:23, 16 May 2014 (UTC)

X mark.svg Not done - Although popularised by Dunkin' Donuts, which was started in 1950, the use of Donut, goes back to at least 1900 - as explained - with references here - Arjayay (talk) 15:43, 16 May 2014 (UTC)

The Greeks invented the fried dough treats..[edit]

 In Greece, loukoumades are commonly spiced with cinnamon in a honey syrup and can be sprinkled lightly with powdered sugar.

In ancient Greece, these deep fried dough balls were served to the winners of the Greek Olympics. The Greek poet Callimachus was the first to state that these deep fried dough balls were soaked in honey and then served to the winners as "honey tokens". from Wikipedia — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.92.180.24 (talk) 16:54, 17 May 2014 (UTC)

Donuts in Austria[edit]

As it is already mentioned in the Article, the "Krapfen" has got no hole, but a filling. Also, the dough is different. The Krapfen is battered, but is not as fat as a donut. The dough is much softer. Also in austria there are Donuts. It is true that the "Bauernkrapfen" looks similar, but I wouldn't really say, that the Krapfen is a derviate of a donut. It has got more similarity with a pastry or a pie, just that it is filled with jam/marmalade or sometimes vanilla or chocolate. I, as an Austrian, would see the Krapfen as a sweet confectionery/desert in its own right. The donut could be the fat uncle from USA, but not more. I don't know, if my Input is any use, but as Donuts, especially today, co-exist with other food in most countries, there is not really anything, that would kind of replace a donut, or is really similar to it. Emergency99 (talk) 09:08, 6 September 2014 (UTC)

I found a reliable source[edit]

I found an RS. If anyone wants to use it, I'll put it here:

http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=_W7_ZdXKHt0C&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=Doughnut+dessert&ots=bFgBGEGcnF&sig=0ys3wSm3A1d-XyegxbWPYiv0Spc#v=onepage&q=Doughnut%20dessert&f=false


  1. ^ "Smoutebollen". cookingclarified.com. 
  2. ^ "Smoutebollen". cookingclarified.com. "Croustillons". belgourmet.be.