Talk:Modprobe

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Permanency of modules loaded with modprobe[edit]

In Debian To have modules loaded up at boot time, make entries on "/etc/modules".

Guide does not belong here?[edit]

I was thinking that making a guide for how to use Modprobe on Wikipedia, is not really needed, and would rather belong on WikiMedia (or one of it's daughter sites) - Let me know on my talk page, I am quite sure that guides really do not belong Wikipedia. 80.199.155.134 (talk) 16:39, 24 April 2009 (UTC)

list confusion[edit]

Neither this article nor any other resource seems to accurately describe modprobe.

What does the List command do? Does it list the modules that ARE installed, or the modules the COULD be installed? And whichever one it does, how does one do the other thing?

# modprobe -l ee*

typically lists eeprom.ko. But it is not yet installed! If you look in /sys/bus/i2c/drivers, eeprom is not there.

Now do

# modprobe eeprom

Now look again in /sys/bus/i2c/drivers, and see eeprom is there, containing 0-0050 etc, so you can access RAM SPD data.

But if you do

# modeprobe -l ee*

again, it will list eeprom.ko exactly the same as before, no changes shown. -71.174.178.179 (talk) 16:15, 19 July 2009 (UTC)