Talk:Solar lamp

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Not portable and not 40 watt equivalent[edit]

I'm glad to see this article (stub) exists, but it needs work. While I'm sure an indoor solar lamp is portable, since when are the outdoor ones? While they can be relocated, they are hardly portable (at least not the ones that stake into the ground). And while the indoor reading lamp kind may be plenty bright, the outdoor kind are much dimmer, probably more like 10 watt equivalent. I don't know enough about them to make the edits now, but I'd recommend it to anyone with more knowledge on the subject. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 4.254.84.32 (talk) 09:20, 16 August 2009 (UTC)

Merger proposal[edit]

There is some more work done on the subject at Solar Lights, I suggest that the articles be merged, solar lamp is the better name, I think, so it is not confused with sun light.--Thorseth (talk) 09:11, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

Clearly a duplicate. I got rid of the buyer's guide. --Wtshymanski (talk) 13:17, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

'Indoor garden lamp'[edit]

"Outdoor lamps are used for lawn and garden decorations. Indoor solar lamps are also used for general illumination (i.e. for garages and the solar panel is deattached of the LED lamp)."

Not necessarily; it's possible to use a solar rock light [1] for indoor lighting as well.

Here the solar panel cannot be deattached and doesn't have to; if just by day it is put in a place, where there's enough daylight, to reload the inside battery.

Especcially in more sunny parts of the planet this can be an affordable, easy to use and very environment friendly way to have some illumination inside a room, a shed or a hovel.

In less sunny parts it's allways possible, to use more examples, when (especcially in winter), there's to little light, to load the battery completely on one day. VKing (talk) 16:59, 3 December 2010 (UTC)

Yes, let's do have a detailed explanation of every McGuyver-like way we could illuminate a building. After all, that's why people come to Wikipedia, to read paragraph after paragraph of flabby groupthink that buries the bleeding obvious under a snowstorm of footnotes and tags. Certainly it would never occur to a reader to pick up a lamp and move it, not without detailed painstakingly-edited instruction from the Wikipedia. --Wtshymanski (talk) 17:49, 3 December 2010 (UTC)
Or let's at least take care, that there's some information in this whole encyclopedia about the (existance) of solar rock lights, which at the moment is not the case. VKing (talk) 04:21, 5 December 2010 (UTC)
But of course. We could have a featured list of every single shape that has ever been sold as a solar light. That's the sort of vital useful information that the Wikimedia foundation is fundraising to distribute. No telling how vital that data could be to that hypothetical third-world village who's cut off from all sources of information and yet paradoxically can read the Wikipedia. --Wtshymanski (talk) 05:05, 5 December 2010 (UTC)
Indeed, solar lights are very important for nature and environment; so a Wp-list of every single shape that is available, can lead to a more general use of them and thus realise, that "Wp is changing the world", and in a case like this even "bettering the world".
As said above, these solar rock lights can not only be used for indoor illumination in tropical ("third world") villages, but also in less sunny parts of the planet, namely by using more examples, in case in winter their battery is not completely reloaded in one day. Besides, in (sub-) tropical climate zones there are not only slums and hovels in isolated villages.
Apart from that can be pointed on the fact that these rock lights can even be very usefull in campers and tents. How much better off would environment be already, if just in all these temporary accommodations only solar light would be used?
At the moment there's another climate top conference going on; why not use every single opportunity, to make them redundant as soon as possible in the future? VKing (talk) 03:48, 6 December 2010 (UTC)