Ted Shipkey

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Ted Shipkey
Ted Shipkey.jpeg
Sport(s) Football, basketball
Biographical details
Born (1904-09-28)September 28, 1904
Died July 18, 1978(1978-07-18) (aged 73)
Playing career
Football
1924–1926

Stanford
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1930–1932
1937–1941
1946–1948
1949–1951

Basketball
1930–1933

Arizona State
New Mexico
Los Angeles Dons (ends)
Montana


Arizona State
Head coaching record
Overall 55–43–4 (football)
32–30 (basketball)
Bowls 0–1
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1931, 1938)
Awards
All-American, 1925
All-American, 1926

Theodore E. "Ted" Shipkey (September 28, 1904 – July 18, 1978)[1] was an American football player and coach of football and basketball. Playing football at Stanford University from 1924 to 1926, he was a two-time and All-American selection. Shipkey served as head football coach at Arizona State Teachers College at Tempe, now Arizona State University (1930–1932), the University of New Mexico (1937–1941), and the University of Montana (1949–1951), compiling a career college football coaching record of 55–43–4. He was also the head basketball coach at Arizona State from 1930 to 1933, tallying a mark of 32–30.

Playing career[edit]

Shipkey played end for Stanford under Pop Warner, and was an All-American in 1925 and 1926. He played in two Rose Bowls, and scored Stanford's only touchdowns in both the 1925 Rose Bowl, which Stanford lost to Notre Dame, 27–10, and the 1927 Rose Bowl, which ended in a 7–7 tie with Alabama.[2]

Coaching career[edit]

From 1930 to 1932, he coached at Arizona State, and compiled a 13–10–2 record. From 1937 to 1941 he coached at New Mexico, where he compiled a 30–17–2 record. From 1949 to 1951, he coached at Montana, where he compiled a 12–16 record.

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Arizona State Bulldogs (Independent) (1930)
1930 Arizona State 3–5–1
Arizona State Bulldogs (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1931–1932)
1931 Arizona State 6–2 3–1 1st
1932 Arizona State 4–3–1 2–2–1 T–3rd
Arizona State: 13–10–2 5–3–1
New Mexico Lobos (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1937–1941)
1937 New Mexico 4–4–1 2–3–1 5th
1938 New Mexico 8–3 4–2 T–1st L Sun
1939 New Mexico 8–2 4–2 2nd
1940 New Mexico 5–4 4–2 4th
1941 New Mexico 5–4–1 3–2–1 5th
New Mexico: 26–17–2 17–11–2
Montana Grizzlies (Pacific Coast Conference) (1949)
1949 Montana 5–4 0–3 10th
Montana Grizzlies (NCAA Independent) (1950)
1950 Montana 5–5
Montana Grizzlies (Mountain States Conference) (1951)
1951 Montana 2–7
Montana: 13–10–2
Total: 55–43–4
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ted Shipkey's obituary
  2. ^ Migdol, Gary (1997). Stanford: Home of Champions. Sports Publishing LLC. p. 75. ISBN 1-57167-116-1. Retrieved 2008-03-12. 

External links[edit]