Template:Infobox scientist/testcases

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Isaac Newton[edit]

{{Infobox scientist}} {{Infobox scientist/sandbox}}
Sir Isaac Newton
Head and shoulders portrait of man in black with shoulder-length gray hair, a large sharp nose, and an abstracted gaze
Godfrey Kneller's 1689 portrait of Isaac Newton
(aged 46)
Native name Isaac van Newton
Born (1643-01-04)4 January 1643
[OS: 25 December 1642][1]
Woolsthorpe-by-Colsterworth
Lincolnshire, England
Died 31 March 1727(1727-03-31) (aged 84)
[OS: 20 March 1726][1]
Kensington, Middlesex, England
Resting place Westminster Abbey
51°29′58″N 00°07′39″W / 51.49944°N 0.12750°W / 51.49944; -0.12750Coordinates: 51°29′58″N 00°07′39″W / 51.49944°N 0.12750°W / 51.49944; -0.12750
Other names Zac
Residence England
Fields physics, mathematics, astronomy, natural philosophy, alchemy, Christian theology
Institutions University of Cambridge
Royal Society
Royal Mint
Patrons Patron(s) of Newton
Alma mater Trinity College, Cambridge
Thesis Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687)
Academic advisors Isaac Barrow[2]
Benjamin Pulleyn[3][4]
Notable students Roger Cotes
William Whiston
Known for Newtonian mechanics
Universal gravitation
Infinitesimal calculus
Optics
Binomial series
Newton's method
Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica
Influences Henry More[5]
Polish Brethren[6]
Influenced Nicolas Fatio de Duillier
John Keill
Signature
Is. Newton
Notes
His mother was Hannah Ayscough. His half-niece was Catherine Barton.
Sir Isaac Newton
Head and shoulders portrait of man in black with shoulder-length gray hair, a large sharp nose, and an abstracted gaze
Godfrey Kneller's 1689 portrait of Isaac Newton
(aged 46)
Native name Isaac van Newton
Born (1643-01-04)4 January 1643
[OS: 25 December 1642][1]
Woolsthorpe-by-Colsterworth
Lincolnshire, England
Died 31 March 1727(1727-03-31) (aged 84)
[OS: 20 March 1726][1]
Kensington, Middlesex, England
Resting place Westminster Abbey
51°29′58″N 00°07′39″W / 51.49944°N 0.12750°W / 51.49944; -0.12750Coordinates: 51°29′58″N 00°07′39″W / 51.49944°N 0.12750°W / 51.49944; -0.12750
Other names Zac
Residence England
Fields physics, mathematics, astronomy, natural philosophy, alchemy, Christian theology
Institutions University of Cambridge
Royal Society
Royal Mint
Patrons Patron(s) of Newton
Alma mater Trinity College, Cambridge
Thesis Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687)
Academic advisors Isaac Barrow[2]
Benjamin Pulleyn[3][4]
Notable students Roger Cotes
William Whiston
Known for Newtonian mechanics
Universal gravitation
Infinitesimal calculus
Optics
Binomial series
Newton's method
Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica
Influences Henry More[5]
Polish Brethren[6]
Influenced Nicolas Fatio de Duillier
John Keill
Signature
Is. Newton
Notes
His mother was Hannah Ayscough. His half-niece was Catherine Barton.

Richard Feynman[edit]

{{Infobox scientist}} {{Infobox scientist/sandbox}}
Infobox scientist/testcases
Richard Feynman Nobel.jpg
Born Richard Phillips Feynman
(1918-05-11)May 11, 1918
Far Rockaway, Queens, New York, U.S.
Died February 15, 1988(1988-02-15) (aged 69)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Residence United States
Nationality American
Fields Physics (theoretical)
Institutions Manhattan Project
Cornell University
California Institute of Technology
Patrons Patron(s) of Feynman
Alma mater Massachusetts Institute of Technology (B.S.),
Princeton University (Ph.D.)
Doctoral advisor John Archibald Wheeler
Other academic advisors Manuel Sandoval Vallarta
Doctoral students F. L. Vernon, Jr.[7]
Willard H. Wells[7]
Al Hibbs[7]
George Zweig[7]
Giovanni Rossi Lomanitz[7]
Thomas Curtright[7]
Other notable students Douglas D. Osheroff
Robert Barro
W. Daniel Hillis
Known for Feynman diagrams
Feynman point
Feynman–Kac formula
Wheeler–Feynman absorber theory
Bethe–Feynman formula
Feynman sprinkler
Feynman Long Division Puzzles
Hellmann–Feynman theorem
Feynman slash notation
Feynman parametrization
Path integral formulation
Nanotechnology
Quantum computing
Sticky bead argument
One-electron universe
Quantum cellular automata
Influences Paul Dirac
Notable awards Albert Einstein Award (1954)
E. O. Lawrence Award (1962)
Nobel Prize in Physics (1965)
Oersted Medal (1972)
National Medal of Science (1979)
Spouse Arline Greenbaum (m. 1941–45)(deceased)
Mary Lou Bell (m. 1952–54)
Gweneth Howarth (m. 1960–88) (his death)
Signature
Notes
He was the father of Carl Feynman and adoptive father of Michelle Feynman. He was the brother of Joan Feynman.
Richard Feynman Nobel.jpg
Born Richard Phillips Feynman
(1918-05-11)May 11, 1918
Far Rockaway, Queens, New York, U.S.
Died February 15, 1988(1988-02-15) (aged 69)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Residence United States
Nationality American
Fields Physics (theoretical)
Institutions Manhattan Project
Cornell University
California Institute of Technology
Patrons Patron(s) of Feynman
Alma mater Massachusetts Institute of Technology (B.S.),
Princeton University (Ph.D.)
Doctoral advisor John Archibald Wheeler
Other academic advisors Manuel Sandoval Vallarta
Doctoral students F. L. Vernon, Jr.[7]
Willard H. Wells[7]
Al Hibbs[7]
George Zweig[7]
Giovanni Rossi Lomanitz[7]
Thomas Curtright[7]
Other notable students Douglas D. Osheroff
Robert Barro
W. Daniel Hillis
Known for Feynman diagrams
Feynman point
Feynman–Kac formula
Wheeler–Feynman absorber theory
Bethe–Feynman formula
Feynman sprinkler
Feynman Long Division Puzzles
Hellmann–Feynman theorem
Feynman slash notation
Feynman parametrization
Path integral formulation
Nanotechnology
Quantum computing
Sticky bead argument
One-electron universe
Quantum cellular automata
Influences Paul Dirac
Notable awards Albert Einstein Award (1954)
E. O. Lawrence Award (1962)
Nobel Prize in Physics (1965)
Oersted Medal (1972)
National Medal of Science (1979)
Spouse Arline Greenbaum (m. 1941–45)(deceased)
Mary Lou Bell (m. 1952–54)
Gweneth Howarth (m. 1960–88) (his death)
Signature
Notes
He was the father of Carl Feynman and adoptive father of Michelle Feynman. He was the brother of Joan Feynman.

Donald Knuth[edit]

{{Infobox scientist}} {{Infobox scientist/sandbox}}
Donald Ervin Knuth
KnuthAtOpenContentAlliance.jpg
Donald Knuth at a reception for the Open Content Alliance, October 25, 2005
Born (1938-01-10) January 10, 1938 (age 76)
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
Residence U.S.
Nationality American
Fields Mathematics
Computer science
Institutions Stanford University
Patrons Patron(s) of Knuth
Alma mater Case Institute of Technology
California Institute of Technology
Doctoral advisor Marshall Hall, Jr.
Doctoral students Leonidas J. Guibas
Michael Fredman
Scott Kim
Vaughan Pratt
Robert Sedgewick
Jeffrey Vitter
Andrei Broder
Known for The Art of Computer Programming
TeX, METAFONT
Knuth–Morris–Pratt algorithm
Knuth–Bendix completion algorithm
MMIX
Notable awards Turing Award (1974)
John von Neumann Medal (1995)
Harvey Prize (1995)
Kyoto Prize (1996)
Website
Donald E. Knuth
Donald Ervin Knuth
KnuthAtOpenContentAlliance.jpg
Donald Knuth at a reception for the Open Content Alliance, October 25, 2005
Born (1938-01-10) January 10, 1938 (age 76)
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
Residence U.S.
Nationality American
Fields Mathematics
Computer science
Institutions Stanford University
Patrons Patron(s) of Knuth
Alma mater Case Institute of Technology
California Institute of Technology
Doctoral advisor Marshall Hall, Jr.
Doctoral students Leonidas J. Guibas
Michael Fredman
Scott Kim
Vaughan Pratt
Robert Sedgewick
Jeffrey Vitter
Andrei Broder
Known for The Art of Computer Programming
TeX, METAFONT
Knuth–Morris–Pratt algorithm
Knuth–Bendix completion algorithm
MMIX
Notable awards Turing Award (1974)
John von Neumann Medal (1995)
Harvey Prize (1995)
Kyoto Prize (1996)
Website
Donald E. Knuth

References

These references will appear in the article, but this list appears only on this page.
  1. ^ a b During Newton's lifetime, two calendars were in use in Europe: the Julian or 'Old Style' in Britain and parts of northern Europe (Protestant) and eastern Europe, and the Gregorian or 'New Style', in use in Roman Catholic Europe and elsewhere. At Newton's birth, Gregorian dates were ten days ahead of Julian dates: thus Newton was born on Christmas Day, 25 December 1642 by the Julian calendar, but on 4 January 1643 by the Gregorian. By the time he died, the difference between the calendars had increased to eleven days. Moreover, prior to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar in the UK in 1752, the English new year began (for legal and some other civil purposes) on 25 March ('Lady Day', i.e. the feast of the Annunciation: sometimes called 'Annunciation Style') rather than on 1 January (sometimes called 'Circumcision Style'). Unless otherwise noted, the remainder of the dates in this article follow the Julian Calendar.
  2. ^ Mordechai Feingold, Barrow, Isaac (1630–1677), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004; online edn, May 2007; accessed 24 February 2009; explained further in Mordechai Feingold " Newton, Leibniz, and Barrow Too: An Attempt at a Reinterpretation"; Isis, Vol. 84, No. 2 (June, 1993), pp. 310-338
  3. ^ Dictionary of Scientific Biography, Newton, Isaac, n.4
  4. ^ Gjersten, Derek (1986). The Newton Handbook. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. 
  5. ^ Westfall, Richard S. (1983) [1980]. "Never at Rest: A Biography of Isaac Newton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 530–1. ISBN 9780521274357. 
  6. ^ Snobelen, Stephen D. (1999). "Isaac Newton, heretic: the strategies of a Nicodemite" (PDF). British Journal for the History of Science 32: 381–419. doi:10.1017/S0007087499003751. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Richard Phillips Feynman". Mathematics Genealogy Project (North Dakota State University). Retrieved 2010-03-18. 
  8. ^ "I told him I was as strong an atheist as he was likely to find" (Feynman 2005)