The Revolution: A Manifesto

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This article is about a politics book by Ron Paul. For the historical fiction novel by Jennifer Donnelly, see Revolution (novel).
The Revolution: A Manifesto
The Revolution: A Manifesto
2008 first-edition cover
Author Ron Paul
Country United States
Language English
Genre Politics
Publisher Grand Central Publishing
Publication date
April 30, 2008
Media type Hardcover
Pages 192 pp.
ISBN 978-0-446-53751-3
OCLC 191881970
973.931092 22
LC Class E901.1.P38 A3 2008
Preceded by A Foreign Policy of Freedom

The Revolution: A Manifesto is a New York Times #1 best seller by Republican former U.S. Congressman Ron Paul. The work was published on April 30, 2008 by Grand Central Publishing. According to Paul, the book is based on written notes during his 2008 presidential campaign.

Reception[edit]

Upon release, the book moved to the top of several bestseller lists.[1] It was one of Amazon's Top 10 best sellers, its #1 seller of all political books,[2] and became its #1 seller among all categories.[3][4][5][6][7] Revolution debuted at #7 on the New York Times nonfiction bestseller list and at #2 on its list of bestselling political books for the period of April 12 to May 3, 2008; some bookstores reported receiving bulk orders.[8] It became #1 on the nonfiction list for the week of May 18, 2008.[9] The book spent its third week on the Times best seller list at #7,[10] its fourth at #5,[11] its fifth week at #8 and its sixth week at #10. In its seventh and eighth weeks it was #13 on the list. It took a dip in its ninth week to #22 on The New York Times Bestsellers list and in its 10th week it held steady at #23. As of August 3, 2008 the book is at #24 on the New York Times Best Seller List. On the week of September 15, The Revolution bounced to #10 on the New York Time best seller list and the following week dropped down to #27.[12]

Reviews[edit]

Glenn Reynolds of Instapundit gave the book a favorable, though mixed, review, saying, "The book benefits from many of the Paul campaign’s virtues, in the form of accessibility, clarity, and straightforwardness. On the other hand, it also suffers from some of the Paul campaign’s vices."[13][14] Paul Constant at The Stranger likened Paul to an "ancient high-school civics teacher" who "puffs up" at the notion of the Constitution as a "living document."[15]

David Weigel of Reason reviewed the book favorably, comparing Paul's political ideas to those of fellow anti-war conservative Sen. Chuck Hagel. "Paul has a grand unified theory to offer readers, knowing full well that he's opening minds, not programming them," Weigel wrote, adding that Paul "offers readers, first and foremost, the lesson that 'leaders' and universally accepted concepts shouldn't be trusted. It is worried and informed neostructuralists who can change things, not historical 'great men.' If Ron Paul doesn't provide perfect solutions, he certainly provides a blueprint."[16]

In September 2008, The Washington Post reported that the book was "largely written" by Thomas Woods. Woods contends that his role in authoring the book has been "overemphasized" and that "this is Ron Paul's book in every way." [17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Malcolm, Andrew (2008-05-12). "Ron Paul's forces quietly plot GOP convention revolt against McCain". Top of the Ticket (Los Angeles Times). Retrieved 2008-05-12. 
  2. ^ "Ron Paul's New Book, The Revolution: A Manifesto". U.S. News & World Report. 2008-04-30. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  3. ^ Malcolm, Andrew (2008-05-01). "Ron Paul, political loser, now best-selling author". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  4. ^ Weber, Christopher (2008-05-01). "The Road to Paulville". AOL News. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  5. ^ Wyckoff, Whitney (2008-05-01). "Ron Paul's 'Revolution:' Box Office". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  6. ^ Weigel, David (2008-04-30). "But If You Want Money for People With Minds That Hate...". Reason Magazine. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  7. ^ Sinderbrand, Rebecca (2008-03-30). "Paul No. 1 on Amazon.com". CNN. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  8. ^ Buddo, Orville (2008-05-10). "May's Poli-Book Best Sellers". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  9. ^ "Hardcover Nonfiction". The New York Times. 2008-05-18. Retrieved 2008-05-11. 
  10. ^ "Hardcover Nonfiction". The New York Times. 2008-05-25. Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  11. ^ "Hardcover Nonfiction". The New York Times. 2008-06-08. Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  12. ^ "Hardcover Nonfiction". The New York Times. 2008-06-15. Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  13. ^ Reason Magazine - Hit & Run > Instapundit on Ron Paul's New Blockbuster Book
  14. ^ Pajamas Media » Reading the Ron Paul Revolution
  15. ^ Constant, Paul (2008-04-22). "A Review of The Revolution: A Manifesto". The Stranger. Retrieved 2008-05-03. 
  16. ^ Weigel, David (2008-05-14). "You Won't Fool the Children of the rEVOLution". Reason. Retrieved 2008-05-15. 
  17. ^ Mosk, Matthew. (2008-09-02) "Paul Is Here, and the RNC Isn't Happy", The Washington Post. Retrieved on 2008-09-04.
Preceded by
Are You There, Vodka? It's Me, Chelsea
by Chelsea Handler
#1 New York Times Best Seller Non-Fiction
May 18, 2008
Succeeded by
Audition: A Memoir
by Barbara Walters