University of Houston Law Center

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 29°43′26″N 95°20′16″W / 29.7239°N 95.3379°W / 29.7239; -95.3379

University of Houston Law Center
UH LEX Seal.png
Motto "LEX" (Latin: "law") [1]
Parent school University of Houston
Established 1947
School type Public
Dean Richard M. Alderman (Interim)
Location Houston, Texas, United States
Enrollment 775
Faculty 306
USNWR ranking 48
Bar pass rate 88.6%[2]
Website law.uh.edu
University of Houston Law Center logotype.png

The University of Houston Law Center is the law school of the University of Houston in Houston, Texas. Founded in 1947, the Law Center is one of 12 colleges of the University of Houston, a state university. It is accredited by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools. The law school's facilities are located on the university's 667-acre campus in southeast Houston.

The Law Center awards the Juris Doctor (J.D.) and Master of Laws (LL.M.) degrees. The law school ranks 48th in the 2014 U.S. News & World Report law school rankings.[3]

According to UHLC's 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 63.2% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[4]

The dean of the center is Richard M. Alderman (Interim).

History[edit]

The University of Houston Law Center was founded in 1947 as the College of Law, with an inaugural class consisting of 28 students and a single professor. The law school was housed in several locations on campus in its first few years—including temporary classrooms and the basement of the M.D. Anderson Library. The College of Law moved into its current facilities—located at the northeast corner of campus—shortly following its groundbreaking in 1969.[5]

In 2005, the University of Houston Law Center opened its facilities to Loyola University New Orleans College of Law after it was severely damaged in Hurricane Katrina, hosting 320 of the Loyola's 800 students taught by 31 Loyola law professors, allowing the Loyola students' education to continue uninterrupted.[6]

Rankings[edit]

The O'Quinn Law Library entrance (center) and Bates Law Building (right)

The law school ranks 48th in the 2013 U.S. News & World Report law school rankings. U.S. News also ranks the school in three specialties: eighth for health care law, seventh for intellectual property law, and sixteenth among part-time programs.[3]

In 2010, the school ranked 34th for number of alumni included on the Super Lawyers list.[7] The National Law Journal reported that the Law Center ranked 29th for the percentage of its graduates hired as first-year associates at the nation's 250 largest law firms in 2013.[8] In 2013, the influential law blog "Above the Law" ranked the school 35th on its "Above the Law Top 50 Law Schools List."[9]

Facts[edit]

As of fall 2013, the law school reported a total enrollment of 775 students, and employs a total of 306 full- and part-time faculty on staff.[10]

For the class of 2013, the school received 2,494 applications, with 215 full-time and part-time students matriculating. The median undergraduate GPA among all students at the school is 3.42, with the 25th percentile at 3.17 and 75th percentile at 3.65. The median LSAT score among full-time students was 160, with the 25th percentile at 157 and the 75th percentile at 162. The class of 2016 is 63.6 percent white and 43.9% female.[11]

Of the 2012 graduating class, 61 percent work in law firms, 26 percent in business and industry, 8 percent in government, 2 percent in public interest, and 2 percent as judicial clerks. The average school bar examination passage rate among those reporting was 88.6 percent.[2]

Annual tuition for the 2013-2014 full-time program is $29,748 for Texas residents and $39,792 for non-Texas residents. Annual tuition for the part-time program is $26.487 for Texas residents and $35,235 for non-Texas residents.[12]

Academics[edit]

The J.D. program is 90 semester hours. Entering classes are generally divided into three full-time day sessions of some 60 students each and one part-time evening section of some 35 students for first-year courses.[13]

The Law Center includes six LL.M. programs:[14]

The Law Center offers seven combined and concurrent degree programs in conjunction with other schools: the J.D./M.D. (with the Baylor College of Medicine), the J.D./M.B.A. (with the University of Houston's C. T. Bauer College of Business), the J.D./M.A. in History (with the University of Houston Department of History); the J.D./M.S.W. (with the University of Houston's Graduate School of Social Work); the J.D./M.P.H. (with the University of Texas School of Public Health); and the J.D./Ph.D. in Medical Humanities (with the University of Texas Medical Branch).[15]

The Law Center has eight special programs and institutes:[15]

  • Blakely Advocacy Institute
  • Center for Children, Law & Policy
  • Center for Consumer Law
  • Criminal Justice Institute
  • The Environment, Energy, & Natural Resource Center
  • Health Law & Policy Institute
  • Institute for Higher Education Law & Governance
  • Institute for Intellectual Property & Information Law

The Law Center offers several law clinics for upper-division students: the Civil Clinic, Civil Practice Clinic, Criminal Practice Clinic, Consumer Law Clinic, Domestic Violence Clinic, Immigration Clinic, Juvenile Defense Clinic, Mediation Clinic, and Transactional Clinic.[15]

O'Quinn Law Library[edit]

The O'Quinn Law Library is the school's law library. The director of the library is Spencer Simons.[16] The library has some 435,000 volumes.[15] The library has three special collections:[17]

  • The Frankel Rare Books Collection is a closed-stack collection of rare and out of print books and documents as well as publications of the Law Center faculty.[18]
  • The Judge Brown Admiralty Collection is an admiralty and maritime law collection. Established mainly from an endowment by Houston admiralty lawyers, the collection is named in honor of Judge John Robert Brown, a Houston admiralty attorney who served on the Fifth Circuit. The entire collection was lost during Tropical Storm Allison, but was rebuilt through the Albertus book replacement project, completed in 2007.[19]
  • The Foreign & International Law Collection, which includes books and other documents on Mexican law.[20]

Tropical Storm Allison flooded the library's lower level with eight feet of water in June 2001, destroying 174,000 books and the microfiche collection. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) gave $21.4 million to rebuild the library collection, which was 75 percent of the replacement cost. The collection has since been rebuilt.[21][22]

Journals and publications[edit]

The Law Center publishes five law journals.[23] The Houston Law Review, established in 1963, is the school's main law journal.[24]

The four specialty journals are the Houston Business and Tax Law Journal (business law, tax law; founded in 2001),[25] the Houston Journal of Health Law and Policy (health care law),[26] the Houston Journal of International Law (international law),[27] and the Journal of Consumer & Commercial Law (commercial law).[28]

Employment[edit]

According to UHLC's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 63.2% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[29] UHLC's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 16.5%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[30]

Costs[edit]

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at UGLC for the 2013-2014 academic year is $48,478 for a resident and $58,699.[31] The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years is $197,267 for residents and $239,808 for nonresidents.[32]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "LEX Seal". University of Houston Law Center. Retrieved 2 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "University of Houston Admissions Brochure". University of Houston Law Center. 
  3. ^ a b "University of Houston". Best Law Schools. US News and World Report. 
  4. ^ "UHLC Employment Data". 
  5. ^ "University of Houston Through Time". University of Houston Library. 
  6. ^ Willhoft, Ray (2006-01-06). "The Compassion of Neighbors, The Devotion of Community: Exiled School of Law Thrives During Challenging Times". Loyola University New Orleans. Retrieved 2007-11-15. 
  7. ^ "2010 Super Lawyers U.S. Law School Rankings". Super Lawyers. 
  8. ^ "Go-To Law Schools". The National Law Journal. 
  9. ^ "2013 Above the Law Top 50". Above the Law. 
  10. ^ "U.S. News Reported data". U.S. News and World Report. 
  11. ^ "University of Houston Law Center Profile of the Entering 2013 Class". University of Houston Law Center. 
  12. ^ "2013-2014 Tuition and Fees for Incoming Law Center Students for Fall 2011". University of Houston Law Center. 
  13. ^ "J. D. Program Overview". University of Houston Law Center. 
  14. ^ a b "Master of Laws (LL.M.)". University of Houston Law Center. 
  15. ^ a b c d "About the University of Houston Law Center". University of Houston Law Center. 
  16. ^ "About the O'Quinn Law Library". University of Houston Law Center. 
  17. ^ "O'Quinn Law Library". University of Houston Law Center. 
  18. ^ "Frankel Rare Books Collection". University of Houston Law Center. 
  19. ^ "Judge Brown Admiralty Collection". University of Houston Law Center. 
  20. ^ "Foreign & International Law Research Guides and Bibliographies". University of Houston Law Center. 
  21. ^ "University Of Houston O'Quinn Law Library Eligible For $21.4 Million In FEMA Funds To Replace Books" (Press release). Federal Emergency Management Agency. 2001-11-26. 
  22. ^ Kopatic, Alex (2002). "O'Quinn Law Library Cracks The Books on $42 Million Albertus Project" (PDF). University of Houston Law Center. 
  23. ^ "Journals and Publications". University of Houston Law Center. 
  24. ^ "About the Law Review". Houston Law Review. 
  25. ^ "Houston Business and Tax Law Journal". 
  26. ^ "Houston Journal of Health Law and Policy". 
  27. ^ "Houston Journal of International Law". 
  28. ^ "Journal of Consumer & Commercial Law". 
  29. ^ "UHLC Employment Statistics". 
  30. ^ "UHLC LST Profile". 
  31. ^ "UHLC Cost of Attendance". 
  32. ^ "UHLC LST Profile". 
  33. ^ "Nandita Berry sworn in as Texas Secretary of State, January 7, 2014". sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved January 31, 2014. 
  34. ^ "Victor G. Carrillo". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  35. ^ "Marcia A. Crone". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  36. ^ "Eni Fa'aua'a Hunkin Faleomavaega, Jr". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  37. ^ "Gene Green". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  38. ^ "Vanessa Gilmore". Just the Beginning Foundation. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  39. ^ "ALUM RICHARD HAYNES CREATES A LEGAL LEGACY". University of Houston. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  40. ^ "Randy Hendricks". 2005 Hendricks Sports Management LP. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  41. ^ "John O’Quinn, 68, Star Personal-Injury Lawyer in Texas, Dies". The New York Times. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  42. ^ "Gray H. Miller". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  43. ^ "John Moores". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  44. ^ "Dora Olivo". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  45. ^ "Larry Phillips". Siebman, Burg, Phillips & Smith, LLP. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  46. ^ "Ted Poe". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  47. ^ "Mr. Jose M. Rubio Jr.". State Bar of Texas. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  48. ^ "Michael H. Schneider, Sr". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  49. ^ "Star Jones". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  50. ^ "Olen Underwood". Texas State Directory Press, Inc. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  51. ^ "Dr. Richard Waites". Justia.com. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  52. ^ "Royce West". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  53. ^ "John Whitmire". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  54. ^ "Samuel F. Wright". Service Members Law Center. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  55. ^ "Philip D. Zelikow". Notable Names Data Base. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 

External links[edit]