James E. Rogers College of Law

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James E. Rogers College of Law
Parent school University of Arizona
Established 1915
School type Public[1]
Dean Marc L. Miller
Location Tucson, Arizona, United States
Enrollment 440[1]
Faculty 139[2]
USNWR ranking 38[1]

James E. Rogers College of Law is the law school at the University of Arizona located in Tucson, Arizona and was the first law school founded in the State of Arizona, opening its doors in 1915. Formerly known as University of Arizona College of Law, it was renamed in 1999 in honor of noted broadcasting executive and philanthropist James E. Rogers, a 1962 graduate of the school, and chairman of Sunbelt Communications Company based in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The core values of the College are justice, professional integrity, public leadership, and community service. Each entering class at Arizona Law has approximately 150 students, with a total student body of 500 students.

Arizona Law is fully accredited by the American Bar Association. It is currently ranked 38th nationally by U.S. News and World Report's "Best Graduate Schools 2014", making it a Tier 1 law school.[1] Arizona Law is one of 81 law schools nationwide to have a chapter of the Order of the Coif.

According to Arizona's 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 57.1% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[3]

Employment[edit]

According to Arizona's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 57.1% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[4] Arizona's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 21.8%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[5]

Costs[edit]

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at James E. Rogers College of Law, Arizona, for the 2013-2014 academic year for Arizona Residents is $47,419 and $61,879 for Non-Residents.[6] The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years, starting in 2014, $179,696 for Arizona Residents and $231,152 for Non-Residents .[7]

Programs and centers[edit]

In addition to the J.D. program, the school offers L.L.M. and S.J.D. degrees in Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy, and International Trade and Business Law. The International Trade and Business Law program is offered in coordination with the National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade. Students finishing their L.L.M. degree in either program may continue on to an S.J.D. degree after completing substantial original research into their field of study. Arizona Law also offers a two-year J.D. with Advanced Standing (J.D.A.S.), which is designed for students who have received their first law degree from a university outside the United States.[8]

The complete alphabetical list of Programs & Centers includes:

The school offers J.D. students the opportunity to earn certificates in: Criminal Law & Policy,Environmental Law, Science & Policy Program, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy and International Trade and Business Law. Arizona Law also offers concentrations in: Intellectual Property Law, International Law, and Tax Law.

Faculty[edit]

Marc L. Miller is the current Dean. There are 41 full-time faculty members, many of which have national and international reputations for excellence. As of July 2012, Arizona Law was one of five law schools ranked 33rd in law school faculties based on per capita scholarly impact.[9] A number of the school's professors are preeminent experts in their field, including James Anaya (international human rights), Jean Braucher (bankruptcy law), Robert Glennon (environmental and water law), Boris Kozolchyk (international commercial law), and Tom Mauet (trial advocacy). Ten Arizona Law faculty are noted in the list Most Cited Faculty by Specialty 2007-2011 compiled by Brian Leiter: James Anaya, Jean Braucher, Kirsten H. Engel, David A. Gantz, Robert Glennon, Toni M. Massaro, Marc L. Miller, Carol M. Rose, William K. Sjostrom, Robert A. Williams.[9]

Student publications[edit]

There are three student publications: Arizona Law Review, Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law, and Arizona Journal of Environmental Law & Policy.

Renowned visitors and lecturers[edit]

The following justices from the Supreme Court of the United States have visited Arizona Law as lecturers since 2009: John G. Roberts, Jr., Chief Justice of the United States; Justice Antonin Scalia; Justice Stephen Breyer. Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor served as the Jurist in Residence for the 2005-2006 academic term. In the spring semesters of 2006 through 2008, she taught a course on the Supreme Court that was originated by former Chief Justice, William H. Rehnquist.

In Fall 2006, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg delivered the 27th Isaac Marks Lecture at the school, entitled "Reflections on Arizona’s Pace-Setting Justices: William Hubbs Rehnquist and Sandra Day O’Connor.[10]

In Spring 2006, 2003 Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi taught a course titled "Islam and Human Rights."

Hands-On Learning[edit]

The James E. Rogers College of Law offers a number of clinical programs, including:

  • Arizona Attorney General's Office Clinic
  • Child and Family Law Clinic
  • Civil Rights Restoration Clinic
  • Criminal Defense Clinic
  • Criminal Prosecution Clinic
  • Immigration Law Clinic
  • Indigenous Peoples Law Clinic
  • Mortgage Clinic
  • Ninth Circuit Appellate Representation
  • Tribal Courts Clinic
  • Veterans' Advocacy Clinic

It also offers student organization programs involving client representation, including:

  • Bankruptcy Reaffirmation Clinic
  • Domestic Relations Clinic
  • Himmel Park Legal Referral Clinic
  • Homeless Legal Clinic
  • LGBT Pride Law Clinic
  • Men's Shelter Clinic
  • Minor Guardianship Clinic
  • Tucson Indian Center Legal Referral Clinic
  • Volunteer Lawyers Program

Law students also have the option of participating in the following types of externships:

  • Judicial Clerking Program
  • Federal Public Defender
  • State and Federal Legislative
  • Federal Executive Agency
  • University Medical Center General Counsel's Office
  • Corporate

Sample faculty publications[edit]

  • Anaya, James (1996). Indigenous Peoples in International Law. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 
  • Dobbs, Dan; Paul T. Hayden (1997). Torts and Compensation: Personal Accountability and Social Responsibility for Injury. St. Paul, MN: West Publishing. ISBN 0-314-21111-X. 
  • Glennon, Robert (2009). Unquenchable: America's Water Crisis and What to do About It. Washington, DC: Island Publishing. ISBN 978-1-59726-436-5. 
  • Williams, Robert A. (2005). Like a Loaded Weapon. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press. ISBN 0-8166-4709-7. 

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d University of Arizona (Rogers) | Best Law School | US News
  2. ^ Faculty Directory
  3. ^ "James E. Rogers College of Law Profile on Law School Transparency". 
  4. ^ "Law School Transparency". 
  5. ^ "James E. Rogers College of Law Profile". 
  6. ^ "Tuition and Expenses". 
  7. ^ "James E. Rogers College of Law Profile". 
  8. ^ J.D. with Advanced Standing
  9. ^ a b TOP 70 LAW FACULTIES IN SCHOLARLY IMPACT, 2007-2011
  10. ^ University of Arizona Rogers College of Law - The Annual Marks Lecture
  11. ^ "Bobby Ray Baldock". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  12. ^ "William Docker Browning". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  13. ^ "David C. Bury". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  14. ^ "Raner Collins". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  15. ^ "Valdemar Aguirre Cordova". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  16. ^ "William C. Frey". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  17. ^ "Dennis DeConcini". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  18. ^ "Charles Leach Hardy". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  19. ^ "Cindy K. Jorgenson". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  20. ^ "Ann Kirkpatrick". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  21. ^ "Jon Kyl". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  22. ^ "Stephen M. McNamee". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  23. ^ "Alfredo Chavez Marquez". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  24. ^ "Charles Andrew Muecke". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  25. ^ "Christina Reiss". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  26. ^ "Mary Anne Richey". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  27. ^ "John Roll". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  28. ^ "Paul Gerhardt Rosenblatt". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  29. ^ "Eldon Rudd". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  30. ^ "James A. Teilborg". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  31. ^ "Harry Clay Westover". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  32. ^ "Frank R. Zapata". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 

External links[edit]