You Call Everybody Darlin'

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"You Call Everybody Darlin'" is a popular song. It was written by Sam Martin, Ben Trace, and Clem Watts and published in 1946.

Several versions were recorded that charted in 1948 (mostly recorded that year, but at least one possibly in the previous year): by Al Trace (Clem Watts' real name; the biggest-selling version), Anne Vincent, Jack Smith, The Andrews Sisters, Jerry Wayne, and Jack Lathrop. The song was also recorded by Art Lund that year.

The Al Trace recording was released by Regent Records as catalog number 117. The record first reached the Billboard charts on June 18, 1948 and lasted 22 weeks on the chart, peaking at #1. A separate Al Trace recording, recorded 1946 for Sterling 3023, reached #21 in Billboard's "Most Played In Juke Boxes" survey in a 3 week chart run. Bob Vincent sang lead on both versions.[1]

The Anne Vincent recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 5155. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on July 23, 1948 and lasted 12 weeks on the chart, peaking at #13.[1]

The Jack Smith recording was recorded about December 30, 1947 and released by Capitol Records as catalog number 15155. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on August 13, 1948 and lasted 9 weeks on the chart, peaking at #13.[1]

The Andrews Sisters recording was recorded on July 26, 1948 and released by Decca Records as catalog number 24490. The flip side was "Underneath the Arches". The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on August 27, 1948 and lasted 9 weeks on the chart, peaking at #16.[1]

The Jerry Wayne recording was recorded on July 7, 1948 and released by Columbia Records as catalog number 38286. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on September 10, 1948 and lasted 1 week on the chart, at #26.[1]

The Jack Lathrop recording was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-3109. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on September 17, 1948 and lasted 2 weeks on the chart, peaking at #27.[1]

The Art Lund version was recorded on July 16, 1948 and released by MGM Records as catalog number 10258.

Country singer Lamar Morris revived the tune as a minor country chart song in 1973. American country music artist K. T. Oslin covered the song on her 1990 album, Love in a Small Town. It was the fourth single released from the project and reached #69 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research. 
Preceded by
"The Woody Woodpecker Song" by Kay Kyser
U.S. Billboard Best Sellers in Stores number-one single
August 14–21, 1948 (Al Trace)
Succeeded by
"Twelfth Street Rag" by Pee Wee Hunt