10BASE-F

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10BASE-F is a generic term for the family of 10 Mbit/s Ethernet standards using fiber optic cable. In 10BASE-F, the 10 represents its maximum throughput of 10 Mbit/s, BASE indicates its use of baseband transmission, and F indicates that it relies on medium of fiber-optic cable. In fact, there are at least three different kinds of 10BASE-F. All require two strands of 62.5/125 µm multimode fiber.[1] One strand is used for data transmission and one strand is used for reception, making 10BASE-F a full-duplex technology.

The 10BASE-F variants include 10BASE-FL, 10BASE-FB and 10BASE-FP. Of these only 10BASE-FL experienced widespread use. All 10BASE-F variants deliver 10 Mbit/s over a fiber pair.[1] These 10 Mbit/s standards have been largely replaced by faster Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet and 100 Gigabit Ethernet standards.

10BASE-FL[edit]

10BASE-FL is the most commonly used 10BASE-F specification of Ethernet over optical fiber. In 10BASE-FL, FL stands for fiber optic link. It replaces the original fiber-optic inter-repeater link (FOIRL) specification, but retains compatibility with FOIRL-based equipment. The maximum segment length supported is 2000 meters[2] When mixed with FOIRL equipment, maximum segment length is limited to FOIRL's 1000 meters.[1]

Today, 10BASE-FL is rarely used in networking and has been replaced by the family of Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet and 100 Gigabit Ethernet standards.

10BASE-FB[edit]

The 10BASE-FB (10BASE-FiberBackbone) is a network segment used to bridge network hubs. Due to the synchronous operation of 10BASE-FB, delays normally associated with Ethernet repeaters are reduced, thus allowing segment distances to be extended without compromising the collision detection mechanism. The maximum allowable segment length for 10BASE-FB is 2000 meters.[3]

10BASE-FP[edit]

10BASE-FP calls for a non-powered signal coupler capable of linking up to 33 devices, with each segment being up to 500m in length.[1][4] This formed a star-type network centered on the signal coupler. There are no devices known to have implemented this standard.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Zimmerman, Joann; Spurgeon, Charles (2014). Ethernet: The Definitive Guide, 2nd Edition. O'Reilly Media, Inc. ISBN 978-1-4493-6184-6. Retrieved 28 February 2016. 
  2. ^ "Ethernet Technical Summary". Archived from the original on 2013-07-23. Retrieved 2012-03-24. 
  3. ^ Zimmerman, Joann; Spurgeon, Charles (2014). Ethernet: The Definitive Guide, 2nd Edition. O'Reilly Media, Inc. ISBN 978-1-4493-6184-6. Retrieved 28 February 2016. This media system allowed multiple half-duplex Ethernet signal repeaters to be linked in series, exceeding the limit on the total number of repeaters that could be used in a given 10 Mb/s Ethernet system. 10BASE-FB links were attached to synchronous signaling repeater hubs and used to link the hubs together in a half-duplex repeated backbone system that could span longer distances. Individual 10BASE-FB links could be up to 2,000 meters in length. 
  4. ^ Parker, Tim (10 July 2000). "Obscure standard may make you flip for fibre". ProQuest Computer Science Journals. Rogers Publishing Limited. 13 (11). Retrieved 28 February 2016. 10Base-FP - the Fibre Passive (FP) standard allows for non-powered devices to act as optical signal couplers. 10Base-FP segments can be 0.5 km long; one coupler could link 33 computers. But, just like 10Base-FB, it's unlikely you'll ever find a real live 10Base-FP network.