WARC bands

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The WARC bands are three portions of the shortwave radio spectrum used by licensed and/or certified amateur radio operators. They consist of 30 meters (10.100–10.150 MHz), 17 meters (18.068–18.168 MHz) and 12 meters (24.890–24.990 MHz).[1][2] They were named after the World Administrative Radio Conference, which in 1979 created a worldwide allocation of these bands for amateur use. The bands were opened for use in the early 1980s. Due to their relatively small bandwidth of 100 kHz or less, there is a gentlemen's agreement that the WARC bands may not be used for general contesting. This agreement has been codified in official recommendations, such as the IARU Region 1 HF Manager's Handbook, which states:

Contest activity shall not take place on the 10, 18 and 24 MHz bands.

Non-contesting radio amateurs are recommended to use the contest-free HF bands (30, 17 and 12m) during the largest international contests. (DV05_C4_Rev_07)[3]

12 metre band plan[edit]

IARU Region 1[4][edit]

License class 24.890–24.915 24.915-24.925 24.925-24.929 24.929-24.931 24.931-24.940 24.940-24.990
Effective 1 Jan 2008 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital CW, narrow-band digital, unattended stations Beacons CW, narrow-band digital, unattended stations All modes

IARU Region 2[5][edit]

License class 24.890–24.915 24.915-24.925 24.925-24.929 24.929-24.931 24.931-24.940 24.940-24.990
Effective 1 Jan 2008 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital CW, narrow-band digital, unattended stations Beacons CW, narrow-band digital, unattended stations All modes

Canada[6][edit]

Canada is part of region 2 and as such is subject to the IARU band plan. Radio Amateurs of Canada offers the bandplan below as a recommendation for use by radio amateurs in that country, but it does not have the force of law and should only be considered a suggestion or guideline.

License class 24.890–24.920 24.920-24.925 24.925-24.940 24.940-24.975 24.975-24.978 24.978-24.990
Basic(+), Advanced CW Only Digital only CW, narrow-band digital, wide band digital Phone only TV only Phone only

United States[1][edit]

The United States is part of ITU Region 2 and as such is subject to the IARU band plan. The Amateur Radio Relay League offers the bandplan[1] below as a recommendation for use by radio amateurs in that country, but it does not have the force of law and should only be considered a suggestion or guideline.

License class 24.890–24.930 24.930-24.990
Extra, Advanced, General CW, narrow-band digital CW, phone

IARU Region 3[7][edit]

License class 24.890–24.920 24.920-24.9295 24.9295-24.9305 24.940-24.990
Effective as of 2009 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital Beacons All modes 2 kHz max BW

17 metre band plan[edit]

IARU Region 1[edit]

License class 18.068-18.095 18.095-18.105 18.105-18.109 18.109-18.111 18.111-18.120 18.120-18.168
Effective 1 Jan 2008 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital CW, narrow-band digital, unattended stations Beacons All modes, unattended stations All modes

IARU Region 2[edit]

License class 18.068-18.095 18.095-18.105 18.105-18.109 18.109-18.111 18.111-18.120 18.120-18.168
Effective 1 Jan 2008 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital CW, narrow-band digital, unattended stations Beacons All modes, unattended stations All modes

Canada[6][edit]

Canada is part of region 2 and as such is subject to the IARU band plan. Radio Amateurs of Canada offers the bandplan below as a recommendation for use by radio amateurs in that country, but it does not have the force of law and should only be considered a suggestion or guideline.

License class 18.068-18.095 18.095-18.100 18.100-18.110 18.110-18.168
Basic(+), Advanced CW Only CW, narrow-band digital, wide band digital Digital only Phone only

United States[1][edit]

The United States is part of ITU Region 2 and as such is subject to the IARU band plan. The Amateur Radio Relay League offers the bandplan[1] below as a recommendation for use by radio amateurs in that country, but it does not have the force of law and should only be considered a suggestion or guideline.

License class 18.068-18.110 18.110-18.168
Extra, Advanced, General CW, narrow-band digital CW, phone

IARU Region 3[edit]

License class 18.068-18.095 18.095-18.105 18.105-18.1095 18.1095-18.1105 18.1105-18.168
Effective as of 2009 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital CW, narrow-band digital, wide band digital Beacons All modes

30 metre band plan[edit]

IARU Region 1[edit]

License class 10.100-10.130 10.130-10.150
Effective 1 Jun 2016 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital

Throughout most of the world, the 30 meter band generally cannot be used for "phone" (voice) communications. SSB may be used during emergencies involving the immediate safety of life and property and only by stations actually involved in the handling of emergency traffic.

However, a part of Region 1 is permitted to use phone at certain times.[8] The band segment 10.120 to 10.140 may only be used for SSB transmissions in the area of Africa south of the equator during local daylight hours.

IARU Region 2[edit]

License class 10.100-10.130 10.130-10.140 10.140-10.150
Effective 1 Jan 2008 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital All modes except phone

Canada[6][edit]

Canada is part of Region 2 and as such is subject to the IARU band plan. Radio Amateurs of Canada offers the bandplan below as a recommendation for use by radio amateurs in that country, but it does not have the force of law and should only be considered a suggestion or guideline.

License class 10.100-10.130 10.130-10.140 10.140-10.150
Basic(+), Advanced CW Only Digital only CW, narrow-band digital, wide band digital

United States[edit]

License class 10.100-10.150
Ext., Adv., Gen. (200 watts) CW, narrow-band digital

The USA (Region 2) limits amateur radio users to 200 watts peak envelope power on this band.[9][10]

IARU Region 3[edit]

License class 10.100-10.140 10.140-10.150
Effective 2009 CW Only CW, narrow-band digital

Australia[edit]

Australia (VK, region 3) has a unique set of privileges on 30 metres which allows voice operation on a section of the band for advanced licence holders. The digital segment begins at 10130 kHz. The current band plan has SSB from 10125 – 10135 kHz, with CW only below 10125. Amateurs are advised to use SSB below 10130 whenever possible.

Key for band plans[edit]

= CW only
= CW, narrow band digital ( <= 500 Hz )
= CW, narrow band digital ( <= 500 Hz ), unattended stations
= CW, narrow band digital ( <= 500 Hz ), wide band digital
= Beacons
= CW, phone
= All modes, unattended stations
= All modes except phone
= Digital only
= Phone only
= TV only
= All modes

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e U.S. Amateur Frequency Allocations http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/allocate.html Accessed 9 September 2008
  2. ^ ITU Frequency Allocations http://life.itu.int/radioclub/rr/hfband.htm Accessed 9 September 2008
  3. ^ "IARU Region 1 HF Band Plan (August 2011 edition)" (PDF). IARU Region 1 Monitoring System. IARU. August 2011. p. 4. Retrieved 2 September 2013.
  4. ^ IARU Region 1 band plan http://www.iaru-r1.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=175&Itemid=127 accessed 12 January 2011
  5. ^ IARU Region 2 band plan http://www.iaru-r2.org/wp-content/uploads/region-2-mf-hf-bandplan-e.pdf accessed 12 January 2011
  6. ^ a b c Radio Amateurs of Canada HF/MF band plan "Canadian 0-30 MHz Band Plan" (PDF). Retrieved 1 December 2015. accessed 1 December 2015
  7. ^ IARU Region 3 band plan http://www.iaru-r3.org/r3bandplan.doc accessed 12 January 2011
  8. ^ IARU Region 1 Band Plan http://www.iaru.org/Chapter-5.1.pdf Archived 2005-05-14 at the Wayback Machine accessed 5 April 2010
  9. ^ US Amateur Radio Frequency Allocations http://www.arrl.org/frequency-allocations
  10. ^ US Amateur Radio Band chart http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Regulatory/Band%20Chart/Hambands_color.pdf effective 5, March 2012, accessed 19 June 2012
Range Band ITU Region 1 ITU Region 2 ITU Region 3
LF 2200 m 135.7 kHz – 137.8 kHz
MF 630 m 472 kHz – 479 kHz
160 m 1.810 MHz – 1.850 MHz 1.800 MHz – 2.000 MHz
HF 80 / 75 m 3.500 MHz – 3.800 MHz 3.500 MHz – 4.000 MHz 3.500 MHz – 3.900 MHz
60 m 5.3515 MHz – 5.3665 MHz
40 m 7.000 MHz – 7.200 MHz 7.000 MHz – 7.300 MHz 7.000 MHz – 7.200 MHz
30 m[w] 10.100 MHz – 10.150 MHz
20 m 14.000 MHz – 14.350 MHz
17 m[w] 18.068 MHz – 18.168 MHz
15 m 21.000 MHz – 21.450 MHz
12 m[w] 24.890 MHz – 24.990 MHz
10 m 28.000 MHz – 29.700 MHz
VHF 6 m 50.000 MHz – 52.000 MHz[x] 50.000 MHz – 54.000 MHz
4 m[x] 70.000 MHz – 70.500 MHz N/A
2 m 144.000 MHz – 146.000 MHz 144.000 MHz – 148.000 MHz
1.25 m N/A 220.000 MHz – 225.000 MHz N/A
UHF 70 cm 430.000 MHz – 440.000 MHz 430.000 MHz – 440.000 MHz
(420.000 MHz – 450.000 MHz)[y]
33 cm N/A 902.000 MHz – 928.000 MHz N/A
23 cm 1.240 GHz – 1.300 GHz
13 cm 2.300 GHz – 2.450 GHz
SHF 9 cm 3.400 GHz – 3.475 GHz[y] 3.300 GHz – 3.500 GHz
5 cm 5.650 GHz – 5.850 GHz 5.650 GHz – 5.925 GHz 5.650 GHz – 5.850 GHz
3 cm 10.000 GHz – 10.500 GHz
1.2 cm 24.000 GHz – 24.250 GHz
EHF 6 mm 47.000 GHz – 47.200 GHz
4 mm[y] 75.500 GHz[x] – 81.500 GHz 76.000 GHz – 81.500 GHz
2.5 mm 122.250 GHz – 123.000 GHz
2 mm 134.000 GHz – 141.000 GHz
1 mm 241.000 GHz – 250.000 GHz
THF Sub-mm Some administrations have authorized spectrum for amateur use in this region;
others have declined to regulate frequencies above 300 GHz, leaving them available by default.

[w] HF allocation created at the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference. These are commonly called the "WARC bands".
[x] This is not mentioned in the ITU's Table of Frequency Allocations, but individual administrations may make allocations under "Article 4.4". ITU Radio Regulations.. See the appropriate Wiki page for further information.
[y] This includes a currently active footnote allocation mentioned in the ITU's Table of Frequency Allocations. These allocations may only apply to a group of countries.

See also: Radio spectrum, Electromagnetic spectrum


External links[edit]