1938–39 Gauliga Ostmark

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gauliga Ostmark
Season 1938–39
Champions SK Admira Wien
Relegated Grazer SC
SK Amateure Steyr
RB Wacker Wiener Neustadt
German championship SK Admira Wien
Main article: 1938–39 Gauliga

The 1938–39 Gauliga Ostmark was the inaugural season of the Gauliga Ostmark and organized by the Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen (NSRL), the Sports Office of the Third Reich. In March 1938 Nazi Germany had annexed Austria in what is commonly referred to as the Anschluss, with the Gauliga Ostmark formed as a consequence. Austria and the Austrian football championship thereby ceased to exist until the end of the Second World War.[1]

SK Admira Wien won the championship and qualified for the 1939 German football championship where it lost 9–0 in the final to FC Schalke 04.[2][3]

The Gauliga Ostmark and Gauliga Donau-Alpenland titles from 1938 to 1944, excluding the 1944–45 season which was not completed, are recognised as official Austrian football championships by the Austrian Bundesliga.[4]

Table[edit]

The 1938–39 season saw four new clubs in the league, SV Amateure Fiat, Grazer SC, SK Amateure Steyr and Reichsbahn Wacker Wiener Neustadt.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 SK Admira Wien (C) 18 12 4 2 62 20 +42 28 Qualification to German championship
2 SC Wacker 18 12 2 4 52 27 +25 26
3 SK Rapid Wien 18 11 3 4 60 29 +31 25
4 Wiener Sportclub 18 10 4 4 50 28 +22 24
5 First Vienna FC 18 9 4 5 47 37 +10 22
6 FK Austria Wien 18 9 3 6 55 40 +15 21
7 SV Amateure Fiat 18 6 3 9 47 50 −3 15
8 Grazer SC (R) 18 5 1 12 34 53 −19 11 Relegation
9 SK Amateure Steyr (R) 18 2 0 16 22 75 −53 4
10 Reichsbahn Wacker Wiener Neustadt (R) 18 2 0 16 17 87 −70 4
Source: RSSSF.com
Rules for classification: 1) Points;
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Where's My Country? Austrian clubs in the German football structure 1938-1944". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 18 January 2016. 
  2. ^ "Germany 1938–39". claudionicoletti.eu. Retrieved 15 January 2016. 
  3. ^ "German championship 1939". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 15 January 2016. 
  4. ^ "Österreichs Meister" [Austrian championship]. bundesliga.at (in German). Austrian Football Bundesliga. Retrieved 19 January 2016. 

External links[edit]