1940 Tennessee Volunteers football team

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1940 Tennessee Volunteers football
National champion (Dunkel, Williamson)
SEC champion
Sugar Bowl, L 13–19 vs. Boston College
ConferenceSoutheastern Conference
Ranking
APNo. 4
1940 record10–1 (5–0 SEC)
Head coachRobert Neyland (14th season)
Base defenseSingle-wing
Home stadiumShields–Watkins Field
Seasons
← 1939
1941 →
1940 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 4 Tennessee $ 5 0 0     10 1 0
No. 9 Mississippi State 4 0 1     10 0 1
Ole Miss 3 1 0     9 2 0
Alabama 4 2 0     7 2 0
Auburn 3 2 1     6 4 1
LSU 3 3 0     6 4 0
Georgia 2 3 1     5 4 1
Florida 2 3 0     5 5 0
Kentucky 1 2 2     5 3 2
Tulane 1 3 0     5 5 0
Vanderbilt 1 5 1     3 6 1
Georgia Tech 1 5 0     3 7 0
Sewanee 0 1 0     3 5 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1940 Tennessee Volunteers represented the University of Tennessee in the 1940 college football season. Playing as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the team was led by head coach Robert Neyland, in his 14th year, and played their home games at Shields–Watkins Field in Knoxville, Tennessee. They finished the season with a record of ten wins and one loss (10–1 overall, 5–0 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a loss against Boston College in the 1941 Sugar Bowl.

This team won the school's second national championship after being recognized as national champion under the Williamson System, a power rating system created by Paul Williamson, a New Orleans geologist, and the Dunkel System, a power index system devised by Dick Dunkel, Sr.[1]

Schedule[edit]

DateOpponentRankSiteResultAttendance
September 28Mercer*W 49–0
October 5Duke*
  • Shields–Watkins Field
  • Knoxville, TN
W 13–0
October 12Chattanooga*
  • Shields–Watkins Field
  • Knoxville, TN
W 55–0
October 19at AlabamaNo. 5W 27–1224,500
October 26FloridaNo. 5
  • Shields–Watkins Field
  • Knoxville, TN (rivalry)
W 14–0
November 2LSUdaggerNo. 7
  • Shields–Watkins Field
  • Knoxville, TN
W 28–0
November 9at Southwestern (TN)*No. 5W 41–0
November 16Virginia*No. 5
  • Shields–Watkins Field
  • Knoxville, TN
W 41–14
November 23KentuckyNo. 6
  • Shields–Watkins Field
  • Knoxville, TN (rivalry)
W 33–0
November 30at VanderbiltNo. 6W 20–0
January 1vs. No. 5 Boston College*No. 4L 13–1973,181
  • *Non-conference game
  • daggerHomecoming
  • Rankings from AP Poll released prior to the game

[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). "National Poll Rankings" (PDF). 2011 NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA. pp. 75, 77. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  2. ^ "Tennessee Football History and Records: Tennessee Results 1940–49". University of Tennessee Athletics. Retrieved March 12, 2012.