1999 Arkansas Razorbacks football team

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1999 Arkansas Razorbacks football
Conference Southeastern Conference
Division Western Division
Ranking
Coaches No. 19
AP No. 17
1999 record 8–4 (4–4 SEC)
Head coach Houston Nutt (2nd year)
Co-defensive coordinator Bobby Allen (2nd year)
Co-defensive coordinator Keith Burns (2nd year)
Home stadium Razorback Stadium
(Capacity: 50,019)

War Memorial Stadium
(Capacity: 53,727)
Seasons
« 1998 2000 »
1999 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
Eastern Division
#12 Florida x   7 1         9 4  
#9 Tennessee   6 2         9 3  
#16 Georgia   5 3         8 4  
Kentucky   4 4         6 6  
Vanderbilt   2 6         5 6  
South Carolina   0 8         0 11  
Western Division
#8 Alabama x$   7 1         10 3  
#13 Mississippi State   6 2         10 2  
#22 Ole Miss   4 4         8 4  
#17 Arkansas   4 4         8 4  
Auburn   2 6         5 6  
LSU   1 7         3 8  
Championship: Alabama 34, Florida 7
  • $ – BCS representative as conference champion
  • x – Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1999 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas during the 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season.[1]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 4, 1999 7:00 PM at SMU* No. 18 Cotton BowlDallas, TX PPV W 26–0   51,019
September 18, 1999 6:00 PM Louisiana-Monroe* No. 15 War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 44–6   55,382
September 25, 1999 2:30 PM at Alabama No. 14 Bryant–Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, AL CBS L 28–35   83,818
October 2, 1999 12:30 PM at Kentucky Commonwealth StadiumLexington, KY PPV L 20–31   62,606
October 9, 1999 6:00 PM Middle Tennessee* Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 58–6   51,896
October 16, 1999 6:00 PM South Carolina War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 48–14   55,123
October 30, 1999 11:30 AM Auburndagger Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR JPS W 34–10   51,133
November 6, 1999 5:05 PM at No. 23 Ole Miss No. 24 Vaught–Hemingway StadiumOxford, MS (Arkansas–Ole Miss rivalry) ESPN2 L 16–38   50,928
November 13, 1999 11:30 AM No. 3 Tennessee Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR JPS W 28–24   52,815
November 20, 1999 8:00 PM No. 12 Mississippi State No. 22 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR ESPN2 W 14–9   55,491
November 26, 1999 1:30 PM at LSU No. 17 Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, LA (Battle for the Golden Boot) CBS L 10–35   77,160
January 1, 2000 10:15 AM vs. No. 14 Texas No. 24 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Cotton Bowl Classic) FOX W 27–6   72,723
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Central Time.

1990–1999 statistical leaders[edit]

Passing[edit]

Year Player Com Att % Yards
1990 Quinn Grovey 120 235 51 1886
1991 Jason Allen 48 102 47 603
1992 Barry Lunney Jr. 91 189 48 1015
1993 Barry Lunney Jr. 104 202 51 1241
1994 Barry Lunney Jr. 101 183 55 1345
1995 Barry Lunney Jr. 180 292 62 2181
1996 Pete Burks 115 224 51 1390
1997 Clint Stoerner 173 357 48 2347
1998 Clint Stoerner 167 312 54 2629
1999 Clint Stoerner 177 317 56 2293

Rushing[edit]

Year Player Att Yards Avg
1990 E. D. Jackson 155 596 3.8
1991 E. D. Jackson 143 641 4.5
1992 E. D. Jackson 118 466 3.9
1993 Oscar Malone 89 555 6.2
1994 Oscar Malone 99 597 6.0
1995 Madre Hill 307 1387 4.5
1996 Oscar Malone 197 814 4.1
1997 Rod Stinson 111 413 3.7
1998 Chrys Chukwuma 149 870 5.8
1999 Cedric Cobbs 116 668 5.8

Receiving[edit]

Year Player Rec Yards YPC
1990 Derek Russell 43 897 20.9
1991 Ron Dickerson Jr. 25 372 14.9
1992 Kirk Botkin 33 257 7.8
1993 J. J. Meadors 28 429 15.3
1994 J. J. Meadors 43 613 14.3
1995 Anthony Eubanks 43 596 13.9
1996 Anthony Eubanks 51 809 15.9
1997 Anthony Eubanks 51 870 17.1
1998 Michael Williams * 44 560 12.7
1999 Anthony Lucas 37 822 22.2
Receiving leaders by receptions
  • In 1998, Anthony Lucas caught 43 passes for a school-record 1,004 yards receiving. He was the first player in school history to have over 1,000 yards receiving in a single season. His record has since been broken twice (Jarius Wright in 2011, and Cobi Hamilton in 2012).

References[edit]