2017 VR12

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2017 VR12
2017 VR12 radar 2018-03-07 DSS13 to GBT bistatic.gif
Goldstone/Green Bank Telescope radar images of 2017 VR12[1]
Discovery [2]
Discovered byPan-STARRS 1
Discovery siteHaleakala Obs.
Discovery date10 November 2017
(first observed only)
Designations
MPC designation2017 VR12
NEO · PHA
Apollo[3] · Amor[2][a]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc118 days
Aphelion1.7389 AU
Perihelion1.0004 AU
1.3697 AU
Eccentricity0.2696
1.60 yr (585.50 d)
8.8927°
0° 36m 53.64s / day
Inclination9.2247°
347.32°
180.74°
Earth MOID0.0077 AU (3.0 LD)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions160 m × 100 m[4]
Mean diameter
160 m[1]
1.4 h[1]
1.5 h[5]
V[1]
20.6[3]

2017 VR12 is a sub-kilometer asteroid with a somewhat elongated and angular shape, approximately 160 meters (500 feet) in diameter. It is classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo or Amor group.[a] The V-type asteroid has a rotation period of approximately 1.5 hours.[5] It was first observed on 10 November 2017 by the 60-inch Pan-STARRS 1 telescope at Haleakala Observatory in Hawaii.[2][3]

Orbit and classification[edit]

It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.0–1.7 AU once every 1 years and 7 months (585 days; semi-major axis of 1.37 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.27 and an inclination of 9° with respect to the ecliptic.[3] 2017 VR12 is a V-type asteroid with a bright surface.[1]

2018 flyby[edit]

Orbit of 2017 VR12
Animation of 2017 VR12's orbit from 1 October 2016 to 1 October 2018
   2017 VR12 ·   Mercury ·   Venus ·   Earth ·   Mars

2017 VR12 passed 0.0097 AU (3.76 lunar distances) from Earth on 7 March 2018, the closest approach by this asteroid currently known. It brightened to 12th magnitude, making it one of the brightest Near Earth asteroids of the year. It was observed by radar from Goldstone, Green Bank and Arecibo Observatory. Images revealed that 2017 VR12 is a slightly elongated and angular body with a size of approximately 160 by 100 meters.[1][6][4]

Physical characteristics[edit]

Images obtained at Green Bank and Arecibo observatories in 2018, revealed that 2017 VR12 is a slightly elongated and angular body with a size of approximately 160 by 100 meters.[1][6][4]

Rotation period[edit]

On 5 March 2018, a rotational lightcurve was obtained from photometric observations by astronomers at the Northolt Branch Observatories. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 1.5 hours with a brightness amplitude between 0.4 and 0.5 magnitude (U=n.a).[5]

Gallery[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b It is either an Amor or an Apollo asteroid, depending on the definition of those orbital classes: JPL SBDB defines Apollo asteroids as those with a perihelion of less than 1.017 AU (smaller than Earth's aphelion),[10] while the MPC uses a threshold of 1.000 AU (Earth's semi-major axis). 2017 VR12's perihelion is 1.0004 AU.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Goldstone Radar Observations Planning: Asteroid 2017 VR12". NASA. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "2017 VR12". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2017 VR12)" (2018-02-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
  4. ^ a b c #TeamRadar at @NAICobservatory observed asteroid 2017 VR12 last night. 3:05 PM - 6 Mar 2018
  5. ^ a b c Wells, G.; Bamberger, D. (5 March 2018). "Lightcurve of 2017 VR12". Northolt Branch Observatories. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
  6. ^ a b c Hignett, Katherine (6 March 2018). "2017 VR12: Asteroid Could Be Bigger Than the Empire State Building—Here's How to See It". newsweek.com. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
  7. ^ "Near Earth asteroid 2017 VR12". Northolt Branch Observatories. 15 February 2018. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
  8. ^ "Near Earth asteroids 2017 VR12, (505657) 2014 SR339 and (508871) 2003 CN17". Northolt Branch Observatories. 26 February 2018. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
  9. ^ "Near Earth asteroid 2017 VR12". Northolt Branch Observatories. 5 March 2018. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
  10. ^ "NEO Groups". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 March 2018.

External links[edit]