2121 Sevastopol

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2121 Sevastopol
Discovery [1]
Discovered by T. Smirnova
Discovery site Crimean Astrophysical Obs.
Discovery date 27 June 1971
Designations
MPC designation (2121) Sevastopol
Named after
Sevastopol city[2]
1971 ME · 1932 HM
1936 WD · 1938 DY
1939 TO · 1952 SZ
1968 QJ1 · 1977 ED2
1978 WG
main-belt · Flora[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 79.82 yr (29,154 days)
Aphelion 2.5731 AU
Perihelion 1.7945 AU
2.1838 AU
Eccentricity 0.1783
3.23 yr (1,179 days)
94.889°
0° 18m 19.44s / day
Inclination 4.3780°
145.72°
160.38°
Known satellites 1[3][4]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 8.736±0.037 km[5]
12.48 km (calculated)[3]
2.90640 h[3]
0.24 (assumed)[3]
0.308±0.023[5]
S[3]
12.2
S/2010 (2121) 1
Discovery
Discovered by D. Higgins, P. Pravec, P. Kusnirak, J. Pollock, J. Oey, M. Husarik, G. Cervak, D. E. Reichart, K. M. Ivarsen, J. B. Haislip, and A. LaCluyze
Discovery date 2010/07/23
Light curve
Orbital characteristics
26 km
1.546 d
13 hours, 6 minutes
46 mas (maximum)
Satellite of 2121 Sevastopol
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 3.54 ± 0.17 km
Volume 20.0-26.7 km3 (assumed)
1.9 ± 0.1 fainter than primary
~16.1

2121 Sevastopol, provisional designation 1971 ME, is a stony Florian asteroid and synchronous binary system from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 27 June 1971, by Russian astronomer Tamara Smirnova at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnij, on the Crimean peninsula.[6] Its minor-planet moon was discovered in 2010.

Orbit and characterization[edit]

Sevastopol is a member of the Flora family, one of the largest groups of stony asteroids in the main-belt. It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.8–2.6 AU once every 3 years and 3 months (1,179 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.18 and an inclination of 4° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Satellite[edit]

In 2010, a minor-planet moon, designated S/2010 (2121) 1, was discovered around Sevastopol, orbiting at a distance of 26 kilometers with a diameter of 3.54 ± 0.17 km.[4]

Naming[edit]

The asteroid was named after the Crimean city on the 200th anniversary of its foundation.[2] The approved naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 28 January 1983 (M.P.C. 7616).[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2121 Sevastopol (1971 ME)" (2016-09-12 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2121) Sevastopol. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 172. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (2121) Sevastopol". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Johnston, Robert. "(2121) Sevastopol". johnstonsarchive.net. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "2121 Sevastopol (1971 ME)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 
  7. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 June 2017. 

External links[edit]