6th Georgia Volunteer Infantry

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6th Georgia Volunteer Infantry
Flag of the State of Georgia (1861, blue).svg
Georgia State flag prior to 1879
Active 1861–April 26, 1865
Country  Confederate States of America
Allegiance Georgia
Branch  Confederate States Army
Type Infantry
Engagements

American Civil War

Commanders
Notable
commanders
Colonel Alfred H. Colquitt

The 6th Georgia Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It was organized at Macon, Georgia, in April 1861.

Future governor of Georgia, Alfred H. Colquitt, was elected its first colonel. The regiment fought in the Battle of Fredericksburg, the Battle of Antietam and participated in Stonewall Jackson's flank attack at the Battle of Chancellorsville. The unit later saw action at battery Wagner near Charleston, South Carolina, and the battle of Olustee near Ocean Pond, Florida. The remnants and survivors of the regiment surrendered at Greenboro, North Carolina on April 26, 1865, to forces under the command of William T. Sherman.

Organization[edit]

Staff[edit]

Companies[edit]

Battles[edit]

  • Yorktown Siege, Virginia (4/62)Williamsburg, Virginia (5/5/62)
  • Seven Pines, Virginia (5/31/62 - 6/1/62)
  • Seven Days Battles, Virginia (6/25/62 - 7/1/62)
  • Gaines’ Mill, Virginia (6/27/62)
  • Malvern Hill, Virginia (7/1/62)
  • South Mountain, Maryland (9/14/62)
  • Antietam, Maryland (9/17/62)
  • Fredericksburg, Virginia (12/13/62)
  • Chancellorsville, Virginia (5/1/63 - 5/4/63)
  • Grimball’s Landing, James Island, South Carolina (7/16/63)
  • Charleston Harbor, South Carolina (8/63 - 9/63)
  • Olustee, Florida (2/20/64)
  • Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia (5/16/64)
  • Petersburg Siege, Virginia (6/1/64 - 4/1/65)
  • Cold Harbor, Virginia (6/1/64 - 6/3/64)
  • Crater, Virginia (7/30/64)
  • Fort Harrison, Virginia (9/29/64 - 9/30/64)
  • Second Fort Fisher, North Carolina (1/13/65 - 1/15/65)
  • Carolinas Campaign (2/65 - 4/30/65)
  • Bentonville, North Carolina (3/19/65 - 3/21/65)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]