World AIDS Museum and Educational Center

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The World AIDS Museum and Educational Center, located at 1201 NE 26th St. in Wilton Manors, Florida, opened on May 15, 2014.[1][2][3]

The AIDS Museum and Educational Center began as a HIV support group, Pozitive Attitudes ([2]), at the Pride Center in Fort Lauderdale. The facilitator of that group was Steve Stagon and it was his idea to create an AIDS museum, in south Florida because Broward County and Miami-Dade County are "the epicenter of the AIDS crisis in America."[4] A non-profit corporation was set up and fundraising began. After various local exhibits in churches and the Pride Center, once they had enough funding they choose the location on 26th Street.

On Nov 07, 2013, Magic Johnson visited the World AIDS Museum and dedicated the space, 22 years to the day he announced his HIV status. Doors officially opened to the public in May 2014. The World AIDS Museum and Educational Center has a main gallery featuring the historical timeline of the AIDS epidemic, 2 art galleries, and a research library. They also do traveling exhibits and educational programs in the schools. The current CEO is Hugh Beswick and the Operations Manager is Ed Sparan.

Author and AIDS activist Larry Kramer, who spoke there on March 9, 2017,[5] remarked:

What an amazing and outstanding place this is! ...Now they have funding from the state, and can...host groups of students. The exhibition, beautify installed, has, among much else a GMHC [ Gay Men's Health Crisis ] room, an ACT UP room, and a Keith Haring room. The history of hiv/AIDS timeline is extensive, I learned a few thngs myself (and was able to point out a few things that needed correction). The docent is exceptionally knowledgeable.... The board members are exceptionally committed.... They take pride in claiming that Fort Lauderdale is now the largest gay community in the country. This museum certainly beats anything in San Francisco or New York. Spread the word that this place exists![6]

Planned AIDS Museum in Newark, New Jersey[edit]

In the background of he foundation of the World AIDS Museum is a failed project to create an AIDS Museum in Newark, New Jersey.[7] It was founded in December 2004. Plans for the home in Newark developed in 2006 in connection with the 25th anniversary of the AIDS pandemic.[3] One of the museum's goals was to showcase art by HIV positive artists.[8]

Among the museum's (traveling) exhibits have been:

  • an exhibit of art by HIV-positive artists titled "Eyes of Mercy", was held from November 11 through December 1, 2006 at Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ.
  • The museum also co-organized an exhibit titled "Edge of Light: Art in the Age of AIDS" at the Paul Robeson Center Gallery at Rutgers Newark, which ran from July 2007 until December 2007.
  • the World Culture Open Gallery (New York) was the site of a collaborative project called "Positive Still: Artists Respond to AIDS" featuring, among other artwork, five pieces from the AIDS Museum's permanent collection.[citation needed]

The Museum never had any paid staff or a home. Its Web site lists no activities since 2011, although it still (2017) has an active phone number and the Web site.

There is an AIDS Museum in Thailand and another being developed in South Africa.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ross Forman, "World AIDS Museum opens in Fort Lauderdale", Windy City Times, 08-26-2014, http://www.windycitymediagroup.com/lgbt/World-AIDS-Museum-opens-in-Fort-Lauderdale/48764.html, retrieved 09-15-2014
  2. ^ Christiana Lilley, "World AIDS Museum Ready to Open in Wilton Manors", South Florida Gay News, June 11, 2014, p. 31, http://issuu.com/sfgnissues/docs/v5i24, retrieved 09-15-2014
  3. ^ a b Barszewski, Larry (2013-01-31). "World AIDS Museum trying to get started in Broward". Sun Sentinel. Retrieved 2014-04-22. 
  4. ^ World AIDS Museum, "About Us", http://www.worldaidsmuseum.org/about-us/.
  5. ^ [http://www.worldaidsmuseum.org/, retrieved April 13, 2017.
  6. ^ [1], retrieved April 16, 2017.
  7. ^ "Welcome to About Us". aidsmuseum.org. Retrieved 6 January 2011. 
  8. ^ "Social Science Docket 32 Summer - Fall 2011 Guide to Museums in New Jersey" (PDF). Social Science Docket. Summer–Fall 2011. Retrieved 2014-04-22. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°44′41″N 74°10′48″W / 40.7447°N 74.1801°W / 40.7447; -74.1801