Accuracy in Academia

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Accuracy in Academia
Abbreviation AIA
Formation 1985
Headquarters Bethesda, Maryland, United States
Key people
Revenue (2015)
$70,377[1]
Expenses (2015) $139,726[1]
Website www.academia.org

Accuracy in Academia (AIA) is an American organization that seeks to counter what it sees as liberal bias in education.

Mission[edit]

AIA is a nonprofit watchdog group,[2] and think tank that describes itself as "want[ing] schools to return to their traditional mission-the quest for truth".[3] The AIA promotes academic freedom and is particularly critical of what it describes as a left-wing bias in American academia.[4] The AIA characterizes such bias as liberal or communist "indoctrination", and aims to stand up for the rights of politically conservative students and faculty.

History[edit]

The AIA was founded in 1985 by columnist and former Federal Reserve economist Reed Irvine as an outgrowth of Accuracy in Media.

The AIA is run by executive director Malcolm Kline.[3] Its previous executive director, Daniel J. Flynn, was the author of the book Why the Left Hates America.

The group was criticized by prominent conservative and first Secretary of Education, William Bennett, who described AIA as "a bad idea" at the time of its founding in 1986.[5]

Reception[edit]

In 1985 the American Association of University Professors claimed that the AIA is a threat to academic freedom due to the group's efforts to recruit students to report professors alleged to "disseminate misinformation".[6] In contrast, others in academia[who?] have described the AIA as a "useful irritant".[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Accuracy in Academia" (PDF). Foundation Center. Retrieved 14 February 2017. 
  2. ^ Aby, Stephen H. 2007. The academic bill of rights debate: a handbook. Greenwood Publishing Group, ISBN 0-275-99244-6
  3. ^ a b http://www.academia.org/about-aia/
  4. ^ Hunter, James Davison, Culture Wars: The Struggle to Define America, New York: Basic Books, 1992 ISBN 0-465-01534-4
  5. ^ Wiener, Jon (1991). Professors, Politics, and Pop. Verso. p. 110. 
  6. ^ Benjamin, Ernst, et al. 1985. On "Accuracy in Academia" and Academic Freedom. Academe, v71 n5 p1a Sep-Oct 1985.
  7. ^ quoted in Hunter

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°59′06″N 77°05′20″W / 38.9850°N 77.0888°W / 38.9850; -77.0888