Adam Cohen (journalist)

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For other people with the same name, see Adam Cohen.
Adam Cohen
Adam Cohen.jpg
Occupation journalist and author
Notable credit(s) The New York Times

Adam Cohen (born c. 1962)[1] is an American journalist, author, lawyer, and former assistant editorial page editor of The New York Times.[1] He also works in the administration of New York City Mayor de Blasio.

Education[edit]

Cohen graduated from Bronx High School of Science. He obtained his degree from Harvard College and later received his law degree from Harvard Law School where he was the president of the Harvard Law Review.[1]

Career[edit]

After graduating from Harvard Law School, Cohen clerked on the federal D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals and then served as a lawyer for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama.[2] Cohen subsequently worked as a staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in New York City.[3] While at the ACLU, he focused on school finance and educational equity issues and was part of the legal team that brought an Alabama state court class action in 1991, claiming that the public school system violated the state constitution by failing to provide an equitable, adequate or "liberal" education.[4] In 1993 the state courts ruled in favor of the ACLU and the children plaintiffs in Harper v. Hunt, finding that poor schools were not equitably funded.[5] The case subsequently was reviewed in the federal courts.[6] During his tenure as Alabama Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, later President Donald Trump's Attorney General of the United States, fought against the findings of the Alabama courts.[6] Sessions was ultimately successful in his campaign to prevent schools in poorer Alabama communities from being funded at the same level as schools in wealthier districts.[6]

After leaving the ACLU, Cohen spent seven years as a senior writer for TIME magazine, until he left to become a member of the New York Times editorial board.[7] During his tenure at the Times, from 2002 until 2010, Cohen's editorials focused on tech and legal affairs.[8] After leaving the New York Times, he became a lecturer in law at Yale Law School and a fellow at the Yale Information Society Project, teaching courses in media and internet law.[8] He also wrote a legal column which appeared in TIME.com every Monday.[9]

Beginning in 2011, Cohen also served as Special Policy Advisor to New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo.[10][11] In 2014 Cohen joined New York City Mayor de Blasio's administration as Chief Speechwriter.[12] In 2015 he moved to the mayor's Center for Economic Opportunity, as a Special Policy Advisor.[13]Along with Elizabeth Taylor, the literary editor of the Chicago Tribune and Cohen's co-author of American Pharaoh: Mayor Richard J. Daley, His Battle for Chicago and the Nation, Cohen is also co-editor of The National Book Review (thenationalbookreview.com).[14][15] In 2017, Cohen was a Pulitzer Prize juror in the category of criticism.[16]

Cohen is the author of four books, the most recent of which, Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck, was named to the longlist for the 2016 National Book Award, and is slated to be made into an Amazon film, Unfit, starring Dakota Johnson.[17][18]

Books[edit]

  • Nothing to Fear: FDR’s Inner Circle and the Hundred Days That Created Modern America[9]
  • Co-author of American Pharaoh: Mayor Richard J. Daley, His Battle for Chicago and the Nation[1]
  • The Perfect Store: Inside E-Bay"[1]
  • Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck, Penguin Press (Mar. 1, 2016)[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Times Appointment". New York Times. 28 February 2002. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "Times Appointment". The New York Times. 2002-02-28. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-04-11. 
  3. ^ Hershkoff, Helen; Cohen, Adam S. (1992). "School Choice and the Lessons of Choctaw County". Yale Law & Policy Review. 10: 1–29. 
  4. ^ Hershkoff, Helen (1998). Gittell, Marilyn, ed. School Finance: Reform and the Alabama Experience. Strategies for School Equity: Creating Productive Schools in a Just Society. Yale University Press. pp. 24–39. 
  5. ^ Gabrielson, Ryan (2017-01-31). "How Jeff Sessions Helped Kill Equitable School Funding in Alabama". AlterNet. Retrieved 2017-04-07. 
  6. ^ a b c Gabrielson, Ryan (2017-01-31). "How Jeff Sessions Helped Kill Equitable School Funding in Alabama". AlterNet. Retrieved 2017-04-07. 
  7. ^ "Playbook: Cuomo adviser, NYT/Time alumn, to be mayor's speechwriter; reality show on NYC restaurants". Politico PRO. Retrieved 2017-04-11. 
  8. ^ a b Grant, Drew. "New York TImes Writer. Editorial Board Member". Media lite. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Adam Cohen | TIME.com". TIME Ideas. 6 October 2011. Retrieved 20 May 2013. 
  10. ^ "Playbook: Cuomo adviser, NYT/Time alumn, to be mayor's speechwriter; reality show on NYC restaurants". Politico PRO. Retrieved 11 April 2017. 
  11. ^ Confessore, Nicholas (2010-12-09). "Gov.-Elect Andrew Cuomo Names Top Aides". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-04-11. 
  12. ^ "Playbook: Cuomo adviser, NYT/Time alumn, to be mayor's speechwriter; reality show on NYC restaurants". Politico PRO. Retrieved 2017-04-07. 
  13. ^ "CEO NY Center for Economic Opportunity" (PDF). CEO Annual Report. 2014–15. Appendix C. Retrieved 11 April 2017. 
  14. ^ "About Us". The National Book Review. Retrieved 2017-04-11. 
  15. ^ Tribune, Chicago. "Elizabeth Taylor, literary editor". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 11 April 2017. 
  16. ^ "The 2017 Pulitzer Prize Winner in Criticism". www.pulitzer.org. Retrieved 11 April 2017. 
  17. ^ "Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck, by Adam Cohen, 2016 National Book Award Longlist, Nonfiction". www.nationalbook.org. Retrieved 2017-04-11. 
  18. ^ McNary, Dave (2017-03-07). "Dakota Johnson to Star in Courtroom Drama 'Unfit' for Amazon". Variety. Retrieved 2017-04-07. 
  19. ^ "Imbeciles". PenguinRandomhouse.com. Retrieved 21 March 2016. 

External links[edit]