Aedes furcifer

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Aedes furcifer
Scientific classification
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Ae. furcifer
Binomial name
Aedes furcifer
Edwards, 1913

Aedes furcifer was named in 1913 as a nomen novum for nigra Theobald.[1][2] Aedes furcifer and Aedes taylori have been treated as two species, usually found sympatrically, but are difficult to separate morphologically[3] so the term "Aedes furcifer-taylori group" has been used for the two species, and they have not always been differentiated by workers conducting studies on them.[3]

Aedes furcifer is the type species for the Aedes (Diceromyia) furcifer group in the Afrotropical Region, comprising three species: Aedes furcifer (Edwards), Aedes taylori Edwards, and Aedes cordellieri Huang.[3] Immature and adult female Ae. furcifer sensu stricto and Ae. cordellieri are indistinguishable morphologically, with differences in the male gonocoxite being the only characteristic useful in separating the taxa.[4]

Bionomics[edit]

Aedes furcifer is a "tree hole mosquito",[5] i.e., its subadult stages develop in rot-holes in trees.[2] The species has been found in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, and Uganda.[2]

Medical Importance[edit]

Yellow fever, chikungunya, Zika, Bouboui and Bunyamwera viruses have been isolated from members of the furcifer group.[3] Ae. furcifer is involved in monkey-to-man and man-to-man transmission of yellow fever, is a potential vector of dengue virus serotype 2, and is a vector of chikungunya virus.[2]

Aedes furcifer feeds readily on monkeys and humans[5] and has been observed to enter villages to feed on humans so is considered to be an important bridge vector between sylvatic and human populations.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ F. W. Edwards. 1913. Further Notes on African Culicidae. Bulletin of Entomological Research, IV: 47-59; 48; http://www.mosquitocatalog.org/files/pdfs/039100-8.pdf Archived 2016-02-16 at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ a b c d Thomas V. Gaffigan, Richard C. Wilkerson, James E. Pecor, Judith A. Stoffer and Thomas Anderson. 2016. "Aedes (Dic.) furcifer" in Systematic Catalog of Culicidae, Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit, http://www.wrbu.org/SpeciesPages_non-ANO/non-ANO_A-hab/AEfur_hab.html Archived 2016-02-15 at the Wayback Machine, accessed 12 Feb 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Yiau-Min Huang. 1986. Notes on the Aedes (Diceromyia) furcifer Group, With a Description of a New Species (Diptera: Culicidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 88(4): 634-649; http://www.mosquitocatalog.org/files/pdfs/wr237.pdf Archived 2016-02-16 at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ P. G. Jupp. 1998. Aedes (Diceromyia) furcifer (Edwards) and Aedes (Diceromyia) cordellieri Huang in Southern Africa: Distribution and Morphological Differentiation. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 14(3):273-276; https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/content/part/JAMCA/JAMCA_V14_N3_P273-276.pdf.
  5. ^ a b Jupp, PG; McIntosh, BM (1990). "Aedes furcifer and other mosquitoes as vectors of chikungunya virus at Mica, northeastern Transvaal, South Africa". Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 6 (3): 415–420. PMID 1977875.
  6. ^ Diallo, D; Sall, AA; Diagne, CT; Faye, O; Faye, O; Ba, Y; Hanley, KA; Buenemann, M; Weaver, SC; Diallo, M (2014). "Zika virus emergence in mosquitoes in southeastern Senegal, 2011". PLoS One. 9 (10): e109442. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109442. PMC 4195678. PMID 25310102.