Afrania (gens)

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The gens Afrania was a plebeian family at Rome, which is first mentioned in the second century BC. The first member of this gens to achieve prominence was Gaius Afranius Stellio, who became praetor in 185 BC.[1]

Origin[edit]

The nomen Afranius belongs to a class of gentilicia derived from surnames ending in -anus, typically derived from place names.[2] The Afranii may have been of Picentine origin. Lucius Afranius, who held the consulship in 60 BC, was from Picenum, and a Titus Afranius or Afrenius was one of the leaders of the allies during the Social War.[3]

Praenomina[edit]

The main praenomina used by the Afranii were Lucius, Publius, Gaius, Gnaeus and Sextus. There are also several occurrences of Marcus and Quintus, while other praenomina occur infrequently, with individual instances of Aulus, Spurius, and Titus.

Branches and cognomina[edit]

The only cognomen of the Afranii in the time of the Republic is Stellio, referring to a spotted newt or lizard, perhaps with the implication that the bearer was crafty. Other surnames are found under the Empire.[1][4][5]

Members[edit]

This list includes abbreviated praenomina. For an explanation of this practice, see filiation.

Imperial Afranii of uncertain date[edit]

  • Afrania L. l., daughter of Urania, a freedwoman, buried at Narbo, aged eleven.[53]
  • Gnaeus Afranius, the father of Gnaeus Afranius Bromius.[54]
  • Lucius Afranius, named in an inscription from Begastrum in Hispania Citerior.[55]
  • Publius Afranius, the former master of Publius Afranius Hermes and Afrania Romana.[56]
  • Publius Afranius, the father of Publius Afranius Secundus.[57]
  • Quintus Afranius, named in an inscription from Rome.[58]
  • Quintus Afranius, the former master of Quintus Afranius Cresimus.[59]
  • Gaius Afranius Apollinaris, a soldier in the praetorian guard.[60]
  • Gnaeus Afranius Cn. f. Bromius, the husband of Numisia Marcella, buried at Aufidenia in Samnium.[54]
  • Lucius Afranius Cerealis, the former master of Lucius Afranius Eros and Afrania Procilla.[53]
  • Lucius Afranius Clementianus, buried at Thugga in Africa Proconsularis.[61]
  • Lucius Afranius Corinthus, named in a funerary inscription from Brundisium.[62]
  • Quintus Afranius Q. l. Cresimus, named in an inscription from Rome.[59]
  • Lucius Afranius L. l. Eros, a freedman, and the husband of Afrania Procilla, was one of the Sodales Augustales at Tarraco in Hispania Tarraconensis.[53]
  • Marcus Afranius Euporius, one of the Sodales at Olisipo.[63]
  • Sextus Afranius Firmus, named in a libationary inscription from Carnuntum in Pannonia Superior.[64]
  • Lucius Afranius Fortunatianus, buried at Thugga, aged seventeen.[65]
  • Gnaeus Afranius Hermes, buried at Portus.[66]
  • Publius Afranius P. l. Hermes, the husband of Afrania Romana, was a freedman buried at Rome.[56]
  • Afrania Hermione, named in an inscription from Rome.[67]
  • Afrania Hilara, buried at Carnuntum, aged twenty-five.[68]
  • Quintus Afranius Ingenuus, buried at Thuburnica in Africa Proconsularis, aged eighty-five.[69]
  • Lucius Afranius Ipocrates, freedman of Galliopa, buried at Belianes in Hispania Citerior, aged thirty-six.[70]
  • Sextus Afranius S. f. Lautus, son of Afrania Prote, buried at Rome, aged ten years, nine months, and four days.[71]
  • Publius Afranius Major, a soldier in the fifteenth legion, named in a funerary inscription from Carnuntum.[68]
  • Lucius Afranius Maritimus, husband of Julia Severa and father of Lucius Afranius Severus.[72]
  • Sextus Afranius Optatus, named in a funerary inscription from Rome.[73]
  • Sextus Afranius Philetus, buried at Tarquinii, aged fifty-six.[74]
  • Gaius Afranius Plocamus, named in an inscription from Rome.[67]
  • Afrania L. l. Procilla, a freedwoman, and the wife of Lucius Afranius Eros.[53]
  • Afrania Prote, mother of Sextus Afranius Lautus.[71]
  • Afrania P. l. Romana, wife of Publius Afranius Hermes, was a freedwoman buried at Rome, aged twenty-two years, seven months.[56]
  • Publius Afranius P. f. Secundus, a native of Hadrumetum, was buried at Lambaesis in Numidia, aged seventeen years, twenty-eight days.[57]
  • Sextus Afranius Serenus, named in a funerary inscription from Rome.[75]
  • Lucius Afranius Successus, buried at Thugga, aged forty-seven.[76]
  • Lucius Afranius L. f. Severus, son of Lucius Afranius Maritimus and Julia Severa, buried at Albintimilium in Liguria, aged fourteen.[72]
  • Lucius Afranius Victor, a veteran of the third legion, buried at the present site of Mechta Tafsa, formerly part of Mauretania Caesariensis.[77]
  • Publius Afranius Victor, husband of Claudia Ingenua, a centurion buried at Matrica in Pannonia Inferior, aged fifty.[78]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, vol. I, p. 55 ("Afrania Gens").
  2. ^ Chase, p. 118.
  3. ^ Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, vol. I, p. 55 ("Titus Afranius or Titus Afrenius", No. 8).
  4. ^ Chase, pp. 112, 113.
  5. ^ New College Latin & English Dictionary, s. v. stellio.
  6. ^ Livy, xxxix. 23, 25.
  7. ^ Broughton, vol. I, pp. 372, 380.
  8. ^ Livy, xliii. 18, 19.
  9. ^ Quintilian, x. 1. § 100.
  10. ^ Horace, Epistulae, ii. 1. 57.
  11. ^ Macrobius, vi. 1.
  12. ^ Cicero, De Finibus, i. 3, Brutus, 45.
  13. ^ Velleius Paterculus, i. 17, ii. 19.
  14. ^ Gellius, xiii. 8.
  15. ^ Suetonius, "The Life of Nero", 11.
  16. ^ Ausonius, Epigrammata, 71.
  17. ^ Bothe, Poëtae Scenici Latinorum.
  18. ^ Neukirch, De Fabula Togata.
  19. ^ Appian, Bellum Civile, i. 40, 47.
  20. ^ Florus, iii. 18.
  21. ^ Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum, i. 16, 18, 20, Philippicae, xiii. 14.
  22. ^ Plutarch, "The Life of Sertorius", 19, "The Life of Pompeius", 34, 36, 39, 65, 66, "The Life of Caesar", 36.
  23. ^ Cassius Dio, xxxvii. 49, xli. 20–23, 52, xlii. 10, xliii. 12.
  24. ^ Velleius Paterculus, ii. 48, 52.
  25. ^ Caesar, De Bello Civili, i. 38–86.
  26. ^ Appian, Bellum Civile, ii. 42, 43, 65, 76.
  27. ^ Hirtius, De Bello Africo, 95.
  28. ^ Suetonius, "The Life of Caesar", 75.
  29. ^ Florus, iv. 2. § 90.
  30. ^ Livy, Epitome, 114.
  31. ^ Aurelius Victor, De Viris Illustribus, 78.
  32. ^ Broughton, vol. II, pp. 99, 119, 121 (note 4), 182, 183, 220, 252, 266.
  33. ^ a b Eckhel, vol. v, p. 132 ff.
  34. ^ Valerius Maximus, viii. 3. § 1.
  35. ^ Digesta, 3. tit. 1. s. 1. § 5.
  36. ^ CIL VI, 11199.
  37. ^ Caesar, De Bello Civili, i. 74, 84.
  38. ^ Cassius Dio, lix. 8.
  39. ^ Suetonius, "The Life of Caligula", 27.
  40. ^ Tacitus, Annales, xii. 42, 69, xiii. 2, 30, ff, xiv. 7, 51, 52.
  41. ^ Cassius Dio, lii. 13.
  42. ^ Suetonius, "The Life of Nero", 35.
  43. ^ Tacitus, Annales, xv. 49, 56, 70.
  44. ^ CIL VI, 200.
  45. ^ Pliny the Younger, Epistulae, v. 14.
  46. ^ Martial, Epigrammata, vii. 27.
  47. ^ a b Fasti Ostienses, CIL XIV, 244, 245, 4531–4546, 5354, 5355.
  48. ^ a b c CIL XI, 1147.
  49. ^ a b c CIL IX, 2697.
  50. ^ CIL VI, 2384.
  51. ^ CIL VI, 1057.
  52. ^ AE 2011, 990.
  53. ^ a b c d CIL XII, 4377.
  54. ^ a b CIL IX, 2816.
  55. ^ AE 1995, 953b.
  56. ^ a b c CIL VI, 11212.
  57. ^ a b CIL VIII, 18359.
  58. ^ CIL VI, 8218.
  59. ^ a b CIL VI, 34328.
  60. ^ CIL VI, 2906.
  61. ^ MAD, 52.
  62. ^ CIL IX, 6121.
  63. ^ CIL II, 175.
  64. ^ CIL III, 4398.
  65. ^ CIL VIII, 26697.
  66. ^ CIL XIV, 546.
  67. ^ a b CIL VI, 11210.
  68. ^ a b CIL III, 13480.
  69. ^ BCTH, 1915–216.
  70. ^ AE 1972, 318.
  71. ^ a b CIL VI, 11206.
  72. ^ a b Pais, Supplementa Italica, 986.
  73. ^ CIL VI, 34330.
  74. ^ CIL XI, 3397.
  75. ^ CIL VI, 19003.
  76. ^ CIL VIII, 26699.
  77. ^ ILAlg, 02-03, 08336a.
  78. ^ AE 1982, 812.

Bibliography[edit]