Ajit Johnson

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Ajit Johnson
Ajit Johnson Nirmal.jpg
Johnson at the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology conference in 2015
Born
Chennai, India
ResidenceBoston, USA
Alma mater
Known for
Scientific career
InstitutionsHarvard University, Dana–Farber Cancer Institute
Websitewww.ajitjohnson.com

Ajit Johnson is a cancer geneticist. He has also campaigned to raise awareness on tech addiction and net neutrality.[1][2][3][4]

Early life[edit]

Born in Vellore, Johnson graduated with a bachelor's degree in biotechnology at Karunya University. At the age of 10, he started making art. He said, "Being able to tell stories through my art that promotes social awareness, love, hope and encouragement is something I love."[5]

Career[edit]

Education[edit]

Johnson graduated from University College London in 2011 and worked at the Indian Institute of Science. In 2012, he moved to Singapore to work at the National Cancer Centre where he developed a cell based gene therapy for haemophilia patients.[6][7][8][9][10] In 2018 he earned a Doctor of Philosophy in cancer genetics and genomics from the University of Edinburgh.[11]

Research[edit]

Johnson focuses on understanding the differences in molecular signature of immune cells across tumours. He uses large cancer datasets to identify, characterize and model immune system across different tumour types. He developed ImSig, the network-based computational framework that facilitates the characterization of immune cells within the tumor microenvironment.[12][13] His work involves an extensive degree of both experimental and computational based analysis.[14][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cashin, Declan. "These Posters Perfectly Sum Up Twentysomethings' Addiction to the Internet". BuzzFeed.
  2. ^ Bulkley, McKenna. "The Truth About #ThisGeneration". www.huffingtonpost.com.
  3. ^ "These Creatives Supporting Net Neutrality Will Make You Go Save The Internet!". Mad Over Marketing. http://madovermarketing.com/.
  4. ^ "These 13 Witty Protests To Safeguard Net Neutrality Will Surely Prove That When It Comes To Protests, We Indians Just Became So Much More Cooler". storycurry.com/. Story Curry.
  5. ^ "this generation satirical posters".
  6. ^ Nirmal, Ajit Johnson (2013). "Peptide vaccine therapy in colorectal cancer". Vaccines. 1 (1): 1.
  7. ^ "ImSig: Conserved immune cell signature for deconvolution of complex blood and tissue transcriptomic data". F1000Research (4(ISCB Comm J):394). 2015. doi:10.7490/f1000research.1110149.1.
  8. ^ "Cell-cycle analysis and micronuclei frequency reveals G0/G1 blockers as weak micronuclei inducers". Drug and Chemical Toxicology. 36 (2): 249–254. 2013. doi:10.3109/01480545.2012.737803.
  9. ^ "P59. The mechanogrowth factor expression in colorectal cancer: A potential new target for nanoparticles". European Journal of Surgical Oncology. 38 (11): 1122. 2012. doi:10.1016/j.ejso.2012.07.180.
  10. ^ "The role of autophagy in colorectal cancer cells: A pro-survival mechanism". European Journal of Surgical Oncology. 38 (11): 1120. 2012. doi:10.1016/j.ejso.2012.07.173.
  11. ^ "University of Edinburgh: The Roslin Institute".
  12. ^ Nirmal, Ajit J.; Regan, Tim; Shih, Barbara B.; Hume, David A.; Sims, Andrew H.; Freeman, Tom C. (2018-09-28). "Immune Cell Gene Signatures for Profiling the Microenvironment of Solid Tumors". Cancer Immunology Research. doi:10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-18-0342. ISSN 2326-6066. PMID 30266715.
  13. ^ Nirmal, Ajit Johnson (2018-07-10), imsig: Immune Cell Gene Signatures for Profiling the Microenvironment of Solid Tumours, retrieved 2018-10-25
  14. ^ "ImSig: Conserved immune cell signature for deconvolution of complex blood and tissue transcriptomic data". F1000Research (4(ISCB Comm J):394). 2015. doi:10.7490/f1000research.1110149.1.
  15. ^ "University of Edinburgh Group Pages".

External links[edit]