Albany Robichaud

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Albany Robichaud
Member of Parliament
for Gloucester
In office
May 1952 – August 1953
Preceded by Clovis-Thomas Richard
Succeeded by Hédard Robichaud
Personal details
Born Albany M. Robichaud
(1903-07-22)22 July 1903
Shippagan, New Brunswick
Died 27 October 1974(1974-10-27) (aged 71)
Bathurst, New Brunswick[1]
Political party Progressive Conservative
Profession barrister

Albany M. Robichaud (22 July 1903 – 27 October 1974) was a Progressive Conservative party member of the Canadian House of Commons. He was born in Shippagan, New Brunswick and became a barrister by career.

He attended University of St. Joseph's College where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1923, then in 1926 attained a Master of Arts. He proceeded to the University of New Brunswick for law studies where in 1927 he received a Bachelor of Civil Law degree then called to the bar that year. He then established a law practice in Bathurst, New Brunswick and in 1943 received a Doctor of Civil Law degree from Bathurst's Université du Sacré-Coeur. From 1945 to 1948, he was mayor of Bathurst.[1]

Robichaud ran unsuccessful campaigns for a House of Commons seat at the Gloucester riding in several federal elections. In 1930 and 1935 and 1940, he was a Conservative candidate (with the Conservatives known as the "National Government" party in 1940). He ran as an independent at Gloucester in 1945.

Robichaud was elected to Parliament for the Progressive Conservative party in a by-election on 26 May 1952. He was defeated in the 1953 federal election by Hédard Robichaud of the Liberal party.

After leaving federal office, Albany Robichaud became the fifth Acadian to be appointed a judge for the Court of Queen's Bench of New Brunswick, the province's superior court.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Brun, Régis (2000). "Fonds d'Archives No 210 / Répertoire numérique détaillé du fonds (81 cm) / Albany-Robichaud (1883-1975)" (in French). University of Moncton. Archived from the original on 27 September 2002. Retrieved 17 July 2009. 

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