Amos Nzeyi

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Amos Nzeyi
Born 1947 (age 68–69)
Kabale District, Uganda
Residence Kampala, Uganda
Nationality Ugandan
Ethnicity Munyakigezi
Citizenship Uganda
Occupation Businessman
Years active 1967 - present
Known for Wealth
Home town Kabale
Religion Christian

Amos Nzeyi is a Ugandan businessman, entrepreneur, and industrialist. He is one of the wealthiest people in Uganda.[1]

Business interests[edit]

Nzeyi has owned the following businesses wholly or in part:

Other responsibilities[edit]

Besides his personal business interests, Nzeyi has had the following public, fiduciary responsibilities:

  • He is a former member of the board of directors of the Uganda Development Bank.[8]
  • Nzeyi is the chairman of the Uganda Manufacturers' Association. He was elected to a second and final two-year term in May 2015.[9]

Temangalo Saga[edit]

In 2008, Nzeyi and Ugandan Security Minister Amama Mbabazi sold a parcel of land measuring 464 acres (1.88 km2) at a price of US$12,000 per acre to the National Social Security Fund of Uganda (NSSF). The total price was US$5,568,000.

Subsequent inquiry into the transaction, commonly referred to as the Temangalo Saga, discovered irregularities in the transaction. Both the managing director of the NSSF and his deputy were terminated because of this transaction.[10][11] In a subsequent cabinet reshuffle, Minister of Finance Ezra Suruma, whose ministry was responsible for supervising and approving the transaction, was dropped from the cabinet.

As of March 2010, the saga had not yet been resolved. 272 acres (1.10 km2) of the land in question, including one of the personal residences of Nzeyi that sits on that land, had yet to be transferred to NSSF, despite having paid for it in 2008.[12][13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nsehe, Mfonobong (6 November 2012). "Five Ugandan Multi-Millionaires You Should Know". New York: Forbes.com. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  2. ^ The Observer Reporter, . (15 April 2013). "PepsiCo Chief Visits Uganda". The Observer (Uganda). Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  3. ^ Nakaweesi, Dorothy (10 June 2014). "28 Years of Hot Loaves". Daily Monitor. Kampala. Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  4. ^ Newvision Archive, . (1 April 2005). "Amos, A Strictly Pepsi Nzeyi". New Vision. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  5. ^ Gyezaho, Emmanuel (14 January 2013). "Nzeyi, Business Partner In Legal Battle Over Nando's Restaurant". Daily Monitor. Kampala. Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  6. ^ Kasozi, Ephraim (15 April 2014). "Amos Nzeyi Defends Change of Kigezi Bank". Daily Monitor. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  7. ^ Okanya, Andante (22 April 2014). "Nzeyi Explains Decisions In Commerce Bank Case". New Vision. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  8. ^ Juuko, Sylvia (17 April 2006). "Finance Releases USh2 Billion To Boost Uganda Development Bank". New Vision. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  9. ^ Ladu, Ismail Musa (25 May 2015). "Nzeyi Re-elected As UMA Board Chair, Outlines Top Priorities". Daily Monitor. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  10. ^ The Independent Staff (15 January 2009). "Why Museveni Fired Jamwa". The Independent (Uganda). Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  11. ^ Steven Candia, Edward Anyoli, Herbert Sempogo, and Madinah Tebajjukira (22 June 2010). "Chandi Jamwa Jailed On NSSF Mess". New Vision. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  12. ^ Karugaba, Mary (6 October 2008). "I Won't Give Up My House - Amos Nzeyi". New Vision. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  13. ^ Mercy Nalugo, and Sheila Naturinda (15 October 2010). "NSSF Yet To Occupy Temangalo Land". Daily Monitor. Kampala. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 

External links[edit]