Andrew Fairlie (chef)

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Andrew Fairlie
Born(1963-11-21)21 November 1963
Perth, Scotland
Died22 January 2019(2019-01-22) (aged 55)
Culinary career

Andrew Fairlie (21 November 1963 – 22 January 2019) was a Scottish chef. Fairlie was the head chef of the eponymous Restaurant Andrew Fairlie,[1] an independent business within the Gleneagles Hotel and Resort,[2] in Auchterarder, Perthshire. Restaurant Andrew Fairlie is the only restaurant in Scotland with two Michelin stars, [3][4][5] and one of only fifteen in the UK.

Early life and education[edit]

Fairlie was born in Perth, Scotland, and grew up in the city's Letham area. At age 15, he began his training in Perth under chef Keith Podmore, having become interested in food after starting a job polishing glasses at a hotel. At age 20, he was awarded the first Roux Scholarship,[6] giving him the chance to train with French chef Michel Guérard at Les Pres d'Eugenie in Les Landes. Fairlie also spent time working at the Hôtel de Crillon in Paris.[7]

Career[edit]

After returning to the UK, he held a number of positions before returning home to Scotland. At One Devonshire Gardens—where he was appointed head chef in 1994—he won his first Michelin star, the only one in Glasgow at the time.[7] Fairlie opened his own restaurant at the Gleneagles Hotel in 2001 and received a Michelin star within eight months.[8] At Gleneagles he created his signature dish, a locally-sourced lobster smoked over whisky barrel chips. He also began growing rare fruits and vegetables for use in his dishes. In 2005, Fairlie catered the 31st G8 summit. The restaurant was awarded a second Michelin star in 2006.[7]

On 6 November 2018, Fairlie announced he would step down from his Gleneagles restaurant after revealing he had a terminal brain tumour, and would leave the operation of the restaurant to his head chef and business partner effective February 2019.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Fairlie was first diagnosed with cancer in 2005.[8]. He was first married to Ashley, with whom he had two daughters, but the marriage ended in divorce. After receiving his terminal diagnosis, he married his partner, Kate, in November 2018. [7] He died on 22 January 2019 from a brain tumour.[10][11] Fairlie's family announced his death.[12]

Highlights and awards[edit]

In 2002, Hotels magazine voted Restaurant Andrew Fairlie one of the world's top ten hotel restaurants.[13][dead link] In the same year he became the inaugural Scottish Chef of the Year.[14] During the G8 Summit 2005 he cooked for the Queen and 44 of the world's leaders. In 2006, he was AA Chef's Chef of the Year.[15] He was named a Relais & Chateaux Grand Chef du Monde in 2011, one of just seven in the UK.[16] In 2012 Restaurant Andrew Fairlie topped the Sunday Times Food List of the top 100 UK restaurants.[17]

Politics[edit]

During the Scottish independence referendum in 2014, Fairlie declared his support for Scottish independence. He was a member of the Yes Scotland's campaign advisory board.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Restaurant Andrew Fairlie, 2 Michelin Star - Gleneagles, Scotland, UK". www.andrewfairlie.co.uk.
  2. ^ "Gleneagles | 5 Star Luxury Hotel, Spa & Golf Resort in Scotland". Gleneagles.
  3. ^ "Michelin Restaurant Guide".
  4. ^ Complete list of 2009 Michelin Star Restaurants in the UK
  5. ^ "Scottish restaurants keep seat at top table, judges foodie bible". www.scotsman.com.
  6. ^ Andrew's Roux Scholarship 1984 Archived 12 April 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ a b c d Murphy, Sean (22 January 2019). "Andrew Fairlie: How he became Scotland's most celebrated chef". Scotsman Food and Drink. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  8. ^ a b "Gleneagles chef Andrew Fairlie dies". BBC News. 22 January 2019. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  9. ^ "Gleneagles chef Andrew Fairlie stands down after cancer diagnosis". BBC.com. 6 November 2018.
  10. ^ "Andrew Fairlie obituary". The Times. Times Newspapers Limited. 22 January 2019. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  11. ^ "Obituary: Andrew Fairlie, renowned Scottish chef". Heraldscotland. Archived from the original on 23 January 2019.
  12. ^ "Gleneagles chef Andrew Fairlie dies after long-term brain tumour battle". The Herald. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  13. ^ "Hotels magazine article". 1 August 2002.
  14. ^ "İskoç CHEF Ödülleri – 2016".
  15. ^ Catersearch article 21 Sept 2006
  16. ^ "Andrew Fairlie awarded Grand Chef status by Relais & Châteaux" (PDF). Andrewfairlie.co.uk. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  17. ^ "Restaurant Andrew Fairlie tops Sunday Times Food List". The Caterer. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  18. ^ "Scottish independence: 'Yes' stance costs Andrew Fairlie restaurant customers". www.scotsman.com.

See also[edit]