Anilazine

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Anilazine
Anilazine.png
Anilazine-3D-balls.png
Names
IUPAC name
4,6-Dichloro-N-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-amine
Other names
Anilazine (Dyrene); dyrene
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.002.646
EC Number 202-910-5
KEGG
RTECS number XY7175000
UNII
UN number 3077, 2588
Properties
C9H5Cl3N4
Molar mass 275.52 g·mol−1
Appearance White to light brown crystals or powder
Density 1.611 g/cm3
Melting point 159 °C (318 °F; 432 K)
0.0008 g/100mL
Solubility hexane: .017 g/100 mL
methylene chloride: 9 g/100 mL
cetone: 10 g/100 mL
chlorobenzene: 6 g/100 mL
toluene: 5 g/100 mL
xylene: 4 g/100 mL
Vapor pressure 2.48x10-5 mmHg
Hazards
GHS pictograms The corrosion pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)The environment pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word Danger
H315, H318, H319, H400, H410
P264, P273, P280, P302+352, P305+351+338, P310, P321, P332+313, P337+313, P362, P391, P501
Flash point 232.2 °C (450.0 °F; 505.3 K)
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
>5,000 mg/kg
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Anilazine (ǎ-nǐl-a-zēn) is an organic compound with the chemical formula C9H5Cl3N4. It is a pesticide used on crops. It comes under the category of triazine fungicides. It is used for controlling fungus diseases which attack lawns and turf, cereals, coffee, and a wide variety of vegetables and other crops. It is also used for the control of potato and tomato leafspots.

Toxicity[edit]

Oral administration to rats and cats, the most common signs of toxicity were diarrhea and vomiting, respectively. After dermal administration to rabbits, mild skin irritation manifested as edema and erythema was observed. Anilazine was more toxic by intraperitoneal injection than by other routes of administration.[1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Anilazine in the Pesticide Properties DataBase (PPDB)