Antoinette Louw

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Antoinette Louw (born 9 May 1975, Pretoria) is a South African actress, best known for her role as "Inge", the manager of the boutique in the popular South African soap opera 7de Laan.

Life[edit]

Antoinette Louw is the daughter of Dap Louw and Anet Louw, both professors in psychology who have written psychology handbooks for South African universities together. Her brother, Dap,a year younger than her, is a doctor in urology and an Ironman finisher. Raised in Potchefstroom, Vanderbijlpark and Bloemfontein, Antoinette also attended school in the United States of America where her father did research and teaching at various universities. In 1991 the family moved to Bloemfontein, and Antoinette matriculated in 1993 at Sentraal Hoërskool, Bloemfontein. She studied drama at the University of the Free State (UOFS) and receives her degree cum laude in 1996.

In her third year she tried her hand as producer and director of the play, The Woman Who Cooked her Husband, a black comedy by the British playwright Debbie Issit. The production was invited to perform in London at the Courtyard Theatre. During her studies she was also awarded the:

  • André du Plessis award for best second year drama student
  • South African Theatre Journal award for best third year drama student
  • Elsa Krantz award for best drama student 1994-1996
  • UOFS Merit Bursary for Arts and Culture
  • UOFS Honorary Colours for Arts and Culture

She returned to South Africa after a few months in London and studied film acting at the South African School of Film and Dramatic Arts (AFDA) under the direction of award winning playwright, Deon Opperman. There she landed the lead in the M-Net shortfilm, Skidmarks. She was awarded both the AFDA and M-Net Awards for Best Film Actress for her role as Stacey, a second rate beauty queen.

After AFDA she took a break from the entertainment industry for a couple of years (during which she lived in Malta, a small Mediterranean island, for a year). Back in South Africa, she decided to do that which she loved best: acting and writing. Shortly after her arrival in Johannesburg, she landed the role of "Inge van Schalkwyk" in 7de Laan. The original contract of three weeks became two years.

However, after two years on the soap, she returned to her first love: the stage. Recently she was seen at KKNK, Aardklop and the Volksblad Arts Festival as 'Anna' in the upsetting Dis ek, Anna – the stage adaptation of the book with the same title. Currently she is also in veteran film maker Jan Scholtz' first play, Afspraak, with Paul Eilers in the director’s chair.[1][2]

Filmography[edit]

1999 Skidmarks lead Dir: Guy Raphaely/New Wave Productions
2000 Die Netwerk feature Dir: Danie Odendaal/Danie Odendaal Productions(SABC2)
2000 The violin lead Dir: Koos Roos/New Wave Productions
2004 Finding Debbie lead Dir: Eben Wasserman/Eben Wasserman Productions
2004–2007 7de Laan lead Dir: Henry Mylne/Danie Odendaal Productions(SABC2)
2007 Eskom

(corporate)

lead Dir: Zoë Labband/Velvet Films (Eskom)
2008 Jacob’s Cross feature Dir: Neil Sundestrom/Bombshelter Productions(M-Net)
2009 Deeltitel Dames feature Dir: Helene Truter/Penguin Films (Kyk-Net)
2009 Groen Mamba)

(Jak de Priester music video)

lead Dir: Paulo Areal/Moving Billboard Picture Comp.
2009 Fiesta (one episode) presenter Dir: Marius van de Wall/Makietie Produksies (Kyk-Net)

Theatre[edit]

1995 Women of Troy lead: Andromache Wynand Mouton Theatre (Bloemfontein)
1996 - 1997 The Woman who Cooked her Husband lead: Hilary Wynand Mouton Theatre (Bloemfontein) ; The Courtyard Theatre (London)
1998 -1999 Rudely Stamped lead: Angela Grahamstown Festival; Sterrewag Theatre (Bloem)
2000 Engele sonder vlerke lead: Engela Aardklop and KKNK Festivals
2003 Die Trommel lead: Odette Volksblad Art Festival
2008 Simple Bloody Simon lead: Fiona Motto Clique Theatre (Cape Town)
2008–2009 Dis ek, Anna lead: Anna Volksblad Art Festival; KKNK; Aardklop
2009 Afspraak lead: Hermien Volksblad Art Festival; Woordpoort

[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ a b [2]