Arena (1953 film)

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Arena
Arena-1953-poster.jpg
1953 theatrical poster
Directed byRichard Fleischer
Written byArthur M. Loew Jr.
Screenplay byHarold Jack Bloom
Produced byDore Schary
StarringGig Young
Jean Hagen
Polly Bergen
Harry Morgan
Barbara Lawrence
Robert Horton
CinematographyPaul C. Vogel
Edited byCotton Warburton
Music byRudolph G Kopp
Production
company
Distributed byLoew's, Inc
Release date
  • June 24, 1953 (1953-06-24)
Running time
83 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$752,000[1]
Box office$1,022,000[1]

Arena is a 1953 Ansco Color 3-D film directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Gig Young, Jean Hagen, and Polly Bergen. It was promoted as "the first 3-D Western" of the era.

Plot[edit]

A man named Hob Danvers comes to a Tucson, Arizona rodeo with Sylvia Lorgan in tow. Hob has been separated from wife Ruth for two years, and doesn't realize she intends to be at the rodeo.

He meets up with old friends Lew and Meg Hutchins and learns that Lew is here looking for work. He is shocked to find that Lew is now a clown, after many years as a rodeo rider.

Current rodeo star Jackie Roach turns up and makes a pass at Sylvia, who rejects him. Hob competes in bareback riding and so impresses Lew's young son that Lew bribes a cowboy to change places and let him ride a bucking bronco. Lew is thrown and badly injures his leg.

Ruth scolds the others for encouraging Lew, saying everyone should face the hard truth that his rodeo career is done. Lew, angry now, enters the Brahma bull competition over Meg's objections. Hob goes first and is thrown. Lew, attempting to distract the bull, cannot get away quickly enough due to his bad leg. He is fatally gored. Hob walks away, leaving Sylvia behind, but Ruth joins him on the way out.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

According to MGM records the film earned $762,000 in the US and Canada and $260,000 elsewhere, resulting in a profit of $444,000.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study.

External links[edit]