Arthur Remington

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Arthur Edward Remington (28 July 1856 – 17 August 1909) was a Liberal Party Member of Parliament in New Zealand.

Biography[edit]

Parliament of New Zealand
Years Term Electorate Party
1902–1905 15th Rangitikei Liberal
1905–1908 16th Rangitikei Liberal
1908–1909 17th Rangitikei Liberal

Remington was born in 1856 at New Plymouth. Due to the New Zealand Wars, the family returned to their native Jersey, where he received his education. The family returned to New Zealand in 1868, first settling in Auckland, but soon residing in Tauranga, where he first became involved in local body politics.[1]

In 1877, Remington moved to Bulls, where he was a chemist selling tooth powder, which was advanced at the time.[1][2] He was declared bankrupt in 1879.[3]

Remington first stood for Parliament in the Patea electorate in 1896 and 1899, coming second both times.[1]

He won the Rangitikei electorate in the 1902 general election, and held it until he died in 1909.[4] His death triggered the 1909 by-election, which was won by Robert William Smith.[5]

Remington died at his home in Tinakori Road, Wellington. He was survived by his wife Elizabeth Susanna Remington.[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Mr A. E. Remington, M.P.". The Star (9623). 17 August 1909. p. 2. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Schmidt, Andrew (29 September 2011). "Dental care". Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  3. ^ "In Bankruptcy". The Wanganui Herald. XII (9439). 6 June 1879. p. 3. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 229.
  5. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 235.
  6. ^ "Deaths". Dominion. 2 (589). 18 August 1909. p. 4. Retrieved 27 November 2012. 

References[edit]

  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
Frank Lethbridge
Member of Parliament for Rangitikei
1902–1909
Succeeded by
Robert Smith