Big East Men's Basketball Tournament

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Big East Men's Basketball Tournament
Conference Basketball Championship
2008BEMenstourneytrophy.jpg
Sport College basketball
Conference Big East Conference
Number of teams 10
Format Single-elimination tournament
Current stadium Madison Square Garden
Current location New York City
Played 1980–present
Last contest 2016
Current champion Seton Hall Pirates
Most championships Connecticut Huskies, Georgetown Hoyas (7)
Official website BigEast.org
Host stadiums
Madison Square Garden (1983–present)
Hartford Civic Center (1982)
Carrier Dome (1981)
Providence Civic Center (1980)
Host locations
New York City (1983–present)
Hartford, Connecticut (1982)
Syracuse, New York (1981)
Providence, Rhode Island (1980)

The Big East Men's Basketball Tournament is the championship tournament of the Big East Conference in men's basketball. The winner receives the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship. Since 1983, the tournament has been held in Madison Square Garden, New York City. As such, the tournament is the longest running conference tournament at any one site in all of college basketball.

In 2011, Connecticut, led by Kemba Walker, became the first and only team in the Big East Tournament to ever win five games in five consecutive days to win the championship.

The 2009 tournament featured a six-overtime game in the quarterfinals between the Connecticut Huskies and the Syracuse Orange, in which Syracuse prevailed, 127–117. The game, the second longest in NCAA history, started on the evening of March 12 and ended nearly four hours later in the early morning of March 13.[1]

Only two players have achieved repeat MVP honors: Georgetown's Patrick Ewing (1984–1985) and Louisville's Peyton Siva (2012–2013).

As part of the deal in which the original Big East split into the "new" Big East and the American Athletic Conference, the "new" Big East retained the rights to the conference tournament even though The American is the legal successor of the old Big East.

Seeding[edit]

In the last four tournaments before the Big East split into two leagues in 2013, all member schools participating in the tournament (16 from 2010 to 2012, and 14 in 2013) were seeded in the tournament based on their conference records. Non-conference games were ignored. Ties were broken using an elaborate set of tiebreaker rules, with the first two tiebreakers being head-to-head record and common record against the next best conference team.[2] The 2014 tournament, the first held after the split, involved all 10 members of the reconfigured Big East, with similar tiebreakers employed as needed. It is expected that all members will continue to play in future tournaments (barring postseason bans due to NCAA rules violations).

Prior to the 2009 tournament, only the top 12 teams in the conference competed.[1] In 2009, the tournament expanded to include all 16 of the conference's teams. The teams seeded #9 through #16 played first-round games, teams seeded #5 through #8 received a bye to the second round, and the top four teams receive a double-bye to the quarter finals.[3] The final pre-split Big East tournament, held in 2013, saw only 14 teams compete—West Virginia left the Big East for the Big 12 Conference after the 2011–12 season, and Connecticut was barred from the tournament due to an NCAA postseason ban for academic reasons. In that tournament, the teams seeded #11 through #14 played in the first round, with byes remaining the same as in the 2010–12 period.

History[edit]

Jeff Green of the Georgetown Hoyas attempts to pass during the 2007 Big East Championship game against the Pitt Panthers.
Year Champion Score Runner-up MVP Venue
1980 Georgetown 87–81 Syracuse Shelton, CraigCraig Shelton, GU Providence Civic Center (Providence, Rhode Island)
1981 Syracuse 83–80 Villanova Rautins, LeoLeo Rautins, SU Carrier Dome (Syracuse, New York)
1982 Georgetown 72–54 Villanova Floyd, EricEric Floyd, GU Hartford Civic Center (Hartford, Connecticut)
1983 St. John's 85–77 Boston College Mullin, ChrisChris Mullin, St. John's Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1984 Georgetown 82–71 Syracuse Ewing, PatrickPatrick Ewing, GU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1985 Georgetown 92–80 St. John's Ewing, PatrickPatrick Ewing, GU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1986 St. John's 70–69 Syracuse Washington, DwayneDwayne Washington, SU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1987 Georgetown 69–59 Syracuse Williams, ReggieReggie Williams, GU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1988 Syracuse 85–68 Villanova Douglas, ShermanSherman Douglas, SU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1989 Georgetown 88–79 Syracuse Smith, CharlesCharles Smith, GU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1990 Connecticut 78–75 Syracuse Smith, ChrisChris Smith, UConn Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1991 Seton Hall 74–62 Georgetown Taylor, OliverOliver Taylor, SH Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1992 Syracuse 56–54 Georgetown Mourning, AlonzoAlonzo Mourning, GU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1993 Seton Hall 103–70 Syracuse Dehere, TerryTerry Dehere, SH Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1994 Providence 74–64 Georgetown Smith, MichaelMichael Smith, PC Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1995 Villanova 94–78 Connecticut Kittles, KerryKerry Kittles, VU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1996 Connecticut 75–74 Georgetown Page, VictorVictor Page, GU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1997 Boston College 70–58 Villanova Penn, ScoonieScoonie Penn, BC Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1998 Connecticut 69–64 Syracuse El-Amin, KhalidKhalid El-Amin, UConn Madison Square Garden (New York City)
1999 Connecticut 82–63 St. John's Freeman, KevinKevin Freeman, UConn Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2000 St. John's 80–70 Connecticut Thornton, BootsyBootsy Thornton, SJU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2001 Boston College 79–57 Pittsburgh Bell, TroyTroy Bell, BC Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2002 Connecticut 74–65* Pittsburgh Butler, CaronCaron Butler, UConn Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2003 Pittsburgh 74–56 Connecticut Page, JuliusJulius Page, Pitt Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2004 Connecticut 61–58 Pittsburgh Gordon, BenBen Gordon, UConn Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2005 Syracuse 68–59 West Virginia Warrick, HakimHakim Warrick, SU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2006 Syracuse (TITLE VACATED IN 2016) 65–61 Pittsburgh McNamara, GerryGerry McNamara, SU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2007 Georgetown 65–42 Pittsburgh Green, JeffJeff Green, GU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2008 Pittsburgh 74–65 Georgetown Young, SamSam Young, Pitt Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2009 Louisville 76–66 Syracuse Flynn, JonnyJonny Flynn, SU Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2010 West Virginia 60–58 Georgetown Butler, Da'SeanDa'Sean Butler, West Virginia Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2011 Connecticut 69–66 Louisville Walker, KembaKemba Walker, UConn Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2012 Louisville 50–44 Cincinnati Siva, PeytonPeyton Siva, Louisville Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2013 Louisville 78–61 Syracuse Siva, PeytonPeyton Siva, Louisville Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2014 Providence 65–58 Creighton Cotton, BryceBryce Cotton, Providence Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2015 Villanova 69–52 Xavier Hart, JoshJosh Hart, Villanova Madison Square Garden (New York City)
2016 Seton Hall 69–67 Villanova Whitehead, IsaiahIsaiah Whitehead, SH Madison Square Garden (New York City)

Championships by school[edit]

Team Winners Winning Years
Georgetown
7
1980, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 2007
Connecticut
7
1990, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2004, 2011
Syracuse
4
1981, 1988, 1992, 2005
St. John's
3
1983, 1986, 2000
Louisville
3
2009, 2012, 2013
Seton Hall
3
1991, 1993, 2016
Boston College
2
1997, 2001
Pittsburgh
2
2003, 2008
Providence
2
1994, 2014
Villanova
2
1995, 2015
West Virginia
1
2010
Marquette
0
Creighton
0
Xavier
0
DePaul
0
Butler
0
Italics indicate school is no longer a member of the Big East Conference.

Television coverage[edit]

Before the 2013 conference split, the Big East was the only conference to have every tournament game broadcast nationwide on the ESPN family of networks, with every game from the second round forward broadcast on ESPN. 2011 marked the first year the tournament was broadcast in 3D on ESPN 3D.

Beginning with the 2014 tournament, FS1 is the television home for the Big East tournament.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thamel, Pete (March 13, 2009). "Syracuse Left Standing After Marathon Game". The New York Times. Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  2. ^ http://www.bigeast.org/fls/19400/pdfs/men_basketball/tie-breaker10.pdf
  3. ^ "Big East tournament expands to 16 teams". United Press International. November 7, 2007. Archived from the original on 20 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-12. 
  4. ^ http://msn.foxsports.com/collegebasketball/story/complete-2013-college-basketball-on-FOX-TV-schedule-FOX-Sports-1-FSN-090513