Rootletin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from CROCC)
Jump to: navigation, search
CROCC
Identifiers
Aliases CROCC, ROLT, ciliary rootlet coiled-coil, rootletin
External IDs MGI: 3529431 HomoloGene: 16811 GeneCards: CROCC
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_014675

NM_001145958
NM_172122

RefSeq (protein)

NP_055490

NP_001139430.1
NP_742120.2
NP_001139430
NP_742120

Location (UCSC) Chr 1: 16.74 – 16.97 Mb Chr 4: 141.02 – 141.06 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]
Wikidata
View/Edit Human View/Edit Mouse
Rootletin
Identifiers
Symbol Rootletin
Pfam PF15035

Rootletin also known as ciliary rootlet coiled-coil protein (CROCC) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CROCC gene.[3][4][5] Rootletin is a component of the ciliary rootlet, and, together with CEP68 and CEP250, is required for centrosome cohesion.[6]

Rootletin is an important protein in the ciliary rootlet, particular for the structure and can be considered an important protein in mitosis as it is a centrosome linker.

Function[edit]

This protein forms part of the ciliary rootlet structure. It also helps to contribute to the centrosome cohesion before mitosis.[7] Expression of rooletin leads to the formation of fibrous protein.

Structure[edit]

This protein is part of the structure of a ciliary rootlet. This cytoskeletal-like structure starts from the basal body at one end of the cilium and extends towards nucleus. Its molecular structure consists of a globular head domain and a tail domain made up of coiled-coil structures.[3]

Protein interactions[edit]

A large coiled-coil protein, C-Nap1, is a docking site for the fibrous tether to proximal ends of centrioles which Rootletin physically interacts with. Furthermore, Rootletin is phosphorylated by Nek2 kinase.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:". 
  2. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:". 
  3. ^ a b Yang J, Liu X, Yue G, Adamian M, Bulgakov O, Li T (Nov 2002). "Rootletin, a novel coiled-coil protein, is a structural component of the ciliary rootlet". J Cell Biol. 159 (3): 431–40. doi:10.1083/jcb.200207153. PMC 2173070Freely accessible. PMID 12427867. 
  4. ^ McClintock TS, Glasser CE, Bose SC, Bergman DA (Jan 2008). "Tissue expression patterns identify mouse cilia genes". Physiol Genomics. 32 (2): 198–206. doi:10.1152/physiolgenomics.00128.2007. PMID 17971504. 
  5. ^ "Entrez Gene: CROCC ciliary rootlet coiled-coil, rootletin". 
  6. ^ Graser S, Stierhof YD, Nigg EA (December 2007). "Cep68 and Cep215 (Cdk5rap2) are required for centrosome cohesion". J. Cell. Sci. 120 (Pt 24): 4321–31. doi:10.1242/jcs.020248. PMID 18042621. 
  7. ^ Bahe S, Stierhof YD, Wilkinson CJ, Leiss F, Nigg EA (October 2005). "Rootletin forms centriole-associated filaments and functions in centrosome cohesion". J. Cell Biol. 171 (1): 27–33. doi:10.1083/jcb.200504107. PMC 2171225Freely accessible. PMID 16203858. 
  8. ^ Lim HH, Zhang T, Surana U (July 2009). "Regulation of centrosome separation in yeast and vertebrates: common threads". Trends Cell Biol. 19 (7): 325–33. doi:10.1016/j.tcb.2009.03.008. PMID 19576775. 

Further reading[edit]