Charlotte Moore (wheelchair basketball)

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Charlotte Moore
Charlotte Moore.JPG
Personal information
Nationality United Kingdom
Born (1998-09-13) 13 September 1998 (age 20)
Sport
CountryGreat Britain
SportWheelchair basketball
Disability class1.0
Event(s)Women's team
ClubCoventry Wheelchair Basketball Academy

Charlotte Moore (born 13 September 1998) is a wheelchair racer who has won four Virgin London wheelchair mini-marathons, a wheelchair tennis player and a 1.0 point wheelchair basketball player who represented Great Britain at the 2014 Women's World Wheelchair Basketball Championship in Toronto and the 2018 Wheelchair Basketball World Championship in Hamburg.

Biography[edit]

Charlotte Moore was born on 13 September 1998, and began playing wheelchair basketball when she was eight years old. She is classified as a 1.0 point player. She played for the Coventry Ladies AllStars (formerly West Midlands AllStars), and the Coventry Wheelchair Basketball Academy (CWBA) First and Second Teams in the British Wheelchair Basketball National League. She was named the Peter Jackson Young Female Player of the Year in 2012, and made her international debut in the Standard Life Head to Head series against the Netherlands in 2013 when she was 14. This was followed by the U25 European Wheelchair Basketball Championships, where Team Great Britain won the silver medal.[1]

As a wheelchair racer, Moore has won four Virgin London wheelchair mini-marathons.[2] She also plays wheelchair tennis.[1] She was chosen to carry the London 2012 Olympic Torch when the torch relay passed through Warwick on 1 July 2012.[1]

In 2013, Moore was part of the team that won bronze at the European Championship, and silver at the U25 European Championships.[1] The team came fifth at the 2014 Women's World Wheelchair Basketball Championship in Toronto. She won silver at the Osaka Cup in Japan in February 2015,[3][4] and played in the 2015 Women's U25 Wheelchair Basketball World Championship in Beijing,[5] winning gold,[6] and defeated France to take bronze in the 2015 European Championship. [7] In May 2016, she was named as part of the team for the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro.[8] The British team produced its best ever performance at the Paralympics, making it all the way to the semi-finals, but lost to the semi-final to the United States, and then the bronze medal match to the Netherlands.[9]

Achievements[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Charlotte Moore". British Wheelchair Basketball. Retrieved 3 July 2015.
  2. ^ Gilbert, Simon (14 September 2013). "Tile Hill wheelchair basketball player makes it to the world stage". Coventry Telegraph. Retrieved 6 July 2015.
  3. ^ a b "GB Women's Team announced for the Osaka Cup 2015". British Wheelchair Basketball. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  4. ^ a b "Osaka Cup 2015". British Wheelchair Basketball. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  5. ^ "Great Britain Team announced for 2015 Women's U25 World Wheelchair Basketball Championships". British Wheelchair Basketball. Retrieved 3 July 2015.
  6. ^ a b "Great Britain crowned Women's U25 World Champions!". British Wheelchair Basketball. Retrieved 6 July 2015.
  7. ^ a b "Germany earn 10th women's European Wheelchair Basketball Championship title as hosts Britain win men's gold". Inside the Games. Retrieved 9 September 2015.
  8. ^ "British women's wheelchair basketball team named for Rio". International Paralympic Committee. 13 May 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  9. ^ Berkeley, Geoff (17 September 2016). "University of Worcester-based GB women's wheelchair basketball team miss out on bronze medal to dominant Dutch in Rio Paralympics". Worcester News. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  10. ^ a b c "Charlotte Moore". British Wheelchair Basketball. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  11. ^ "NED v GBR". FIBA LiveStats. Retrieved 1 September 2018.