Cross Bones Style

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"Cross Bones Style"
Song by Cat Power
from the album Moon Pix
Published September 22, 1998 (1998-09-22)
Recorded January 1998
Genre Indie rock, southern gothic
Length 4:32
Label Matador
Songwriter(s) Cat Power (lyricist/composer)
Producer(s) Matt Voigt

"Cross Bones Style" is a song by the American singer/songwriter Cat Power (also known as Chan Marshall). It is the tenth song on her 1998 album, Moon Pix.

Background[edit]

Marshall wrote "Cross Bones Style," along with five other songs from Moon Pix, one night in the fall of 1997, after awaking from a hallucinatory nightmare while alone in the South Carolina farmhouse she shared with then-boyfriend, Bill Callahan. "My nightmare was surrounding my house like a tornado," she explained. "So I just ran and got my guitar because I was trying to distract myself. I had to turn on the lights and sing to God. I got a tape recorder and recorded the next sixty minutes. And I played these long changes, into six different songs. That's where I got the record." [1]

Music video[edit]

"Cross Bones Style" was never released as a single, but a music video directed by Brett Vapnek was released for the song. Marshall has cited the video for Madonna's 'Lucky Star' as an influence on the video. In a 1998 interview with Index, she explained, "I'm thinking of making that the single and doing a full-on "Lucky Star" style video. Like Madonna, dancing in a white room. I'm sure I'll chicken out though." [2]

Reception[edit]

In 2008, the song was included in Pitchfork Media's The Pitchfork 500.[3] In 2010, it was ranked #129 in Pitchfork's "The Top 200 Tracks of the 1990s" [4]

In 2006, the music video was ranked #44 in Stylus' top 100 music videos of all-time list.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goodman, Elizabeth (2009). Cat Power: A Good Woman. Three Rivers Press. ISBN 978-0-307-39636-5. 
  2. ^ "Index Magazine". Index Magazine. Retrieved 2010-12-10. 
  3. ^ Plagenhoef, Scott; Schreiber, Ryan, eds. (November 2008). The Pitchfork 500. Simon & Schuster. p. 144. ISBN 978-1-4165-6202-3. 
  4. ^ "Staff Lists: The Top 200 Tracks of the 1990s: 150-101". Pitchfork. 2010-08-31. Retrieved 2010-12-10. 
  5. ^ "Stylus Magazine's Top 100 Music Videos of All Time - Article". Stylus Magazine. Retrieved 2010-12-10.