Cuddesdon Palace

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Cuddesdon Palace[1] was the episcopal palace for the Bishop of Oxford, located near the village of Cuddesdon, Oxfordshire, England.

History[edit]

Cuddesdon Palace was completed by 1634 for John Bancroft, who was Bishop of Oxford from 1632 until 1641.[2] In 1644 during the English Civil War Royalist forces burned the palace to render it unusable by the Parliamentarian forces besieging Oxford.[2] In 1676 John Fell was made Bishop of Oxford and in 1679 he commissioned the complete rebuilding of the palace.[2][3] In 1846 Bishop Samuel Wilberforce had the chapel of Saints Peter and Paul added to the Palace.[2] It was designed by the Gothic Revival architect Benjamin Ferrey.[2]

Successive Bishops of Oxford resided at the palace until Thomas Banks Strong retired in 1937.[2] For the duration of the Second World War Queen Anne's Bounty was evacuated from London and occupied the palace.[2] Thereafter, The Society of the Salutation of Mary the Virgin occupied the palace from 1946 until 1949.[2] In the 1960s the palace was in private use for a few years, but it burnt down before the end of that decade. The bishop's chapel escaped the fire and survives today.[4] Ripon College Cuddesdon is in the grounds of the palace, which is now a private residence.

The Bishop of Oxford now resides in North Oxford.

References[edit]

Coordinates: 51°43′26″N 1°07′55″W / 51.724°N 1.132°W / 51.724; -1.132