Cyrus Massoumi

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Cyrus Massoumi
Cyrus Massoumi.jpg
Nationality American
Alma mater
Occupation Entrepreneur
Known for Founder of Zocdoc
Awards
  • Fortune’s 40 Under 40
  • Crain’s 40 Under 40
  • Forbes Boost Your Business Award for Zocdoc
  • Columbia Business School’s Exemplary Leadership Award

Cyrus Massoumi is a founder of Zocdoc and was the company CEO for eight years.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Massoumi graduated high school at the Phillips Academy in the class of 1994.[2] He then graduated with a BS Degree in Entrepreneurial Management, Finance and Operations and Information Management in 1998 from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He also received an MBA[3] with honors from Columbia University in 2003.[4][5] Massoumi was a recipient of the Heffernan Award for Outstanding Service from Columbia University.[6]

Business career[edit]

Early years[edit]

While in college, Massoumi worked for Walt Disney Company and served as a staffer for a US Senator.[5] In 1998, he joined the business development team of Trilogy Software where he shared a desk with future Zocdoc co-founder Nick Ganju.[3][7] At the age of 22, he founded a software company called OneSizeTooSmall. The company closed in 2001, and Massoumi spent six months backpacking through China to figure out what he wanted to do next.[8] After finishing Columbia Business School, he became an Engagement Manager at McKinsey & Company specializing in healthcare and technology.[6]

Zocdoc[edit]

Massoumi founded Zocdoc together with Nick Ganju and Dr. Oliver Kharraz in 2007. Zocdoc is a New York-based online booking company that provides patients with the option of booking empty slots in doctors’ schedules using their mobile devices.[1] Massoumi got the idea for the company after waiting four days with a ruptured eardrum to try to see a doctor.[9][10] Their services reach 40% of the US population in 1900 cities.[1] As CEO, Massoumi raised $220M. Some of their investors included: Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff, Goldman Sachs, founder of SV Angel Ron Conway, Khosla Ventures, DST, Atomico and the Founders Fund among others.[1] In August 2015, the company was valued at $1.8 billion.[11] Zocdoc was recognized as a Best Place to Work both in New York and Arizona for four consecutive years.[3][12] In November 2015, Massoumi stepped down as the company CEO and passed the job to fellow co-founder Oliver Kharraz.

Board memberships[edit]

Massoumi sits on the Columbia University’s Board of Overseers at the Mailman School of Public Health.[13] He also serves as an Advisor to Refinery29[14] and to ClassPass.[15] He was previously an Advisory Board member of Harboring Hearts, a charitable organization that offers support to heart patients and their families.

Awards and honors[edit]

In 2008, Massoumi won the Forbes Boost Your Business Award for Zocdoc.[16] In 2012, Massoumi ranked at Number 57 in Fast Company’s list of Most Creative People.[17] In 2013, Massoumi was included in Columbia Business School’s article entitled Eight Alumni Who Are Changing the World.[18] He was also featured in Fortune’s 40 Under 40[19] and in 2014, in Crain’s 40 Under 40.[20] In 2015, Massoumi was recognized in Business Insider’s Silicon Alley 100: 1-100 for being one of the “most inspiring people in the New York tech industry”[21] and he was also named Healthcare Hero of the Year by the Palm Beach County Medical Society.[22] In 2016, Massoumi was featured in Built in NYC’s list of 20 Columbia alumni who founded major New York tech companies.[23] That same year he also received Columbia Business School’s Exemplary Leadership Award.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Olson, Palmy. "ZocDoc Is Raising $150 Million At $1.6 Billion Valuation As Digital Health Heats Up". Forbes. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  2. ^ "Phillips Academy". Andover EDU. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "Cyrus Massoumi Named to Crain's New York '40 Under 40' List". McKinsey and Company. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  4. ^ "Who is Cyrus Massoumi?". Biographies. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  5. ^ a b "Cyrus Massoumi – Co-Founder and CEO of ZocDoc". Idea Mensch. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Cyrus Massoumi". Huffington Post. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  7. ^ Jeffries, Adrianne. "The Doctor Will See You Now: How ZocDoc Is Rocking It By Being Just Ambitious Enough". Observer. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  8. ^ Morell, Katie. "Cyrus Massoumi Of ZocDoc Reveals His 4-Part Formula For Success". American Express. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  9. ^ Massoumi, Cyrus. "Israeli Self-Defense or Tai Chi? Depends on Who's Watching". The New York Times. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  10. ^ Wellons, Marie Catherine. "5 Minutes With a Visionary: Cyrus Massoumi". CNBC. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  11. ^ Cao, Jing; Barinka, Alex. "Health-Care Startup ZocDoc's CEO to Be Replaced by Co-Founder". Bloomberg. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  12. ^ Gossie, Michael. "2013 Most Admired Companies in Arizona are honored". AZ Big Media. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  13. ^ "Board of Directors". Harboring Hearts. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  14. ^ Konrad, Alex. "Five Lessons Refinery29 Can Teach You To Be The Next $100M Startup". Forbes.
  15. ^ "ClassPass". Angel List.
  16. ^ "Boost Your Business 2008". Forbes. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  17. ^ "Most Creative People 2012". Fast Company. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  18. ^ Narozny, Chris. "Eight Alumni Who Are Changing the World". Columbia Business School. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  19. ^ "Cyrus Massoumi". Fortune. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  20. ^ "40 Under 40 2014". Crains New York. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  21. ^ Stanger, Melissa; Martin, Emmie; Kosoff, Maya. "SILICON ALLEY 100: 1-100". Business Insider. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  22. ^ "2015 OnCall Quarter 2". ISSUU. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  23. ^ Majewski, Taylor. "20 Columbia alumni who founded major New York tech companies". Built in NYC. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  24. ^ "Exemplary Leadership Awards". Columbia Business School. Retrieved 8 December 2016.