Dangila

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Dangila
Dangila is located in Ethiopia
Dangila
Dangila
Location in Ethiopia
Coordinates: 11°16′N 36°50′E / 11.267°N 36.833°E / 11.267; 36.833
Country Ethiopia
Region Amhara Region
Zone Agew Awi Zone
Population (2005)
 • Total 26,704 (est)
Time zone EAT (UTC+3)

Dangila is a town in northwestern Ethiopia. Located in the Agew Awi Zone of the Amhara Region, this town has a latitude and longitude of 11°16′N 36°50′E / 11.267°N 36.833°E / 11.267; 36.833Coordinates: 11°16′N 36°50′E / 11.267°N 36.833°E / 11.267; 36.833 with an elevation of 2137 meters above sea level. It is the largest of three towns in Dangila woreda.

History[edit]

One of the earliest mentions of Dangila was when the Emperor Susenyos passed through the town in 1620.[1]

As late as the 1930s, Dangila was an important center of the African slave trade. Nagadras Habtewerq, director of customs in the town during the early 1930s, achieved a measure of success in liberating slaves despite the determined opposition of influential Gojjame figures like the slaver Fitawrari Zelleqe.[2]

The British maintained a consulate in Dangila in the 1920s and 1930s, manned by R.E. Cheesman, who spent a considerable amount of energy mapping Agawmeder and nearby Gojjam.[3]

Dangila has played a role in Ethiopian literature. As a young man, Haddis Alemayehu, who was to become the foremost Amharic fiction writer, served for two years as a customs clerk at Dangila in the early 1930s. When consul Cheesman left, the consulate building was turned into a primary school, and Haddis Alemayehu became its headmaster for a year. Another author is Abbe Gubennya, who attended grades 1-8 at the Bitwedded Mengesha Jembere school in the 1950s.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Based on figures from the Central Statistical Agency in 2005, Dangila has an estimated total population of 26,704 of whom 12,916 are men and 13,788 are women.[4] The 1994 census reported this town had a total population of 15,437 of whom 6,796 were men and 8,641 were women.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ G.W.B. Huntingford, Historical Geography of Ethiopia from the first century AD to 1704 (London: British Academy, 1989), p. 176
  2. ^ a b "Local History in Ethiopia" (pdf) The Nordic Africa Institute website (accessed 17 December 2007)
  3. ^ He published an account his explorations in Lake Tana and the Blue Nile, London 1936.
  4. ^ CSA 2005 National Statistics Archived November 23, 2006, at the Wayback Machine., Table B.4