Divilacan

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Divilacan
Municipality of Divilacan
Aerial view of Divilacan after Super Typhoon Megi (PAGASA name: Juan)
Aerial view of Divilacan after Super Typhoon Megi (PAGASA name: Juan)
Official seal of Divilacan
Seal
Map of Isabela with Divilacan highlighted
Map of Isabela with Divilacan highlighted
Divilacan is located in Philippines
Divilacan
Divilacan
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 17°20′N 122°18′E / 17.33°N 122.3°E / 17.33; 122.3Coordinates: 17°20′N 122°18′E / 17.33°N 122.3°E / 17.33; 122.3
Country Philippines
RegionCagayan Valley (Region II)
ProvinceIsabela
District1st District of Isabela
Founded1969
Barangays12 (see Barangays)
Government
[1]
 • TypeSangguniang Bayan
 • MayorVenturito Bulan
 • Vice MayorAlfredo Custodio
 • Electorate3,321 voters (2016)
Area
[2]
 • Total889.49 km2 (343.43 sq mi)
Population
(2015 census)[3]
 • Total5,687
 • Density6.4/km2 (17/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
3335
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)78
Climate typeTropical rainforest climate
Income class2nd municipal income class
Revenue (₱)139,505,953.22 (2016)
Poverty incidence45.72 (2012)[4]
Native languagesIbanag
Ilocano
Kasiguranin
Paranan
Tagalog

Divilacan, officially the Municipality of Divilacan, is a 2nd class municipality in the province of Isabela, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 5,687 people.[3]

Divilacan Bay

Divilacan was formerly a remote sitio of Barrio Antagan in Tumauini. It became a separate municipality on June 21, 1969 by virtue of Republic Act No. 5776. The town’s name was derived from the native Dumagat compound word vilican, meaning “fish and shell.” The word di implies origin. Therefore, Divilacan literally means “where fish and shells abound.”

Barangays[edit]

Divilacan is politically subdivided into 12 barangays.[2]

  • Dicambangan
  • Dicaruyan
  • Dicatian
  • Bicobian
  • Dilakit
  • Dimapnat
  • Dimapula (Poblacion)
  • Dimasalansan
  • Dipudo
  • Dibulos
  • Ditarum
  • Sapinit

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Divilacan
YearPop.±% p.a.
1970 563—    
1975 1,207+16.53%
1980 1,859+9.02%
1990 2,479+2.92%
1995 2,593+0.85%
2000 3,413+6.07%
2007 4,602+4.21%
2010 5,034+3.32%
2015 5,687+2.35%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[3][5][6][7]

In the 2015 census, the population of Divilacan was 5,687 people,[3] with a density of 6.4 inhabitants per square kilometre or 17 inhabitants per square mile.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Divilacan, Isabela
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 28.1
(82.6)
29.5
(85.1)
30.7
(87.3)
32.4
(90.3)
33.8
(92.8)
33.8
(92.8)
33.1
(91.6)
32.8
(91.0)
32.3
(90.1)
31.3
(88.3)
29.6
(85.3)
28.3
(82.9)
31.3
(88.3)
Average low °C (°F) 19.9
(67.8)
20.0
(68.0)
21.9
(71.4)
23.1
(73.6)
24.1
(75.4)
24.4
(75.9)
24.3
(75.7)
24.2
(75.6)
23.9
(75.0)
23.5
(74.3)
22.1
(71.8)
21.0
(69.8)
22.7
(72.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 31.2
(1.23)
23
(0.9)
27.7
(1.09)
28.1
(1.11)
113.5
(4.47)
141.4
(5.57)
176.4
(6.94)
236.6
(9.31)
224.9
(8.85)
247.7
(9.75)
222.9
(8.78)
178
(7.0)
1,651.4
(65)
Average rainy days 10 6 5 5 13 12 15 15 15 17 16 15 144
Source: Climate-Data.org[8]


Transportation[edit]

Divilacan is accessible via sea and air. The town also served by Maconacon Airport in the neighboring town of Maconacon which connects this isolated town to Cauayan Airport, also in Isabela.

The construction of an 82-kilometer Ilagan-Divilacan Road through the protected Sierra Madre mountains is on-going to open access to the coastal towns of Divilacan, Palanan and Maconacon. The approved budget contract of the project amounting to P1.5B, will pass through the foothills of the 359,486-hectare Northern Sierra Madre mountain ranges and will take four years to complete. The project will improve an old logging road used by the defunct Acme Logging Corp. until the 1990s. It will start in Barangay Sindon Bayabo in Ilagan and will end in Barangay Dicatian in the coastal town of Divilacan. The project is started in March 2016 and it will be completed in 2021.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Municipality". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 31 May 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Province: Isabela". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Census of Population (2015). "Region II (Cagayan Valley)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  4. ^ "PSA Releases the 2012 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Archived from the original on 28 January 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2017.
  5. ^ Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region II (Cagayan Valley)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  6. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Region II (Cagayan Valley)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. NSO.
  7. ^ "Province of Isabela". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  8. ^ "Divilacan, Isabela: Average Temperatures and Rainfall". Climate-Data.org. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  9. ^ "P2.3-B Isabela road link completed soon". The Manila Times. January 4, 2018. Retrieved 5 October 2018.

External links[edit]