Donald C. Bruce

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Donald C. Bruce
DonaldCBruce.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Indiana's 11th district
In office
January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1965
Preceded by Joseph W. Barr
Succeeded by Andrew Jacobs Jr.
Personal details
Born (1921-04-27)April 27, 1921
Troutville, Pennsylvania
Died August 31, 1969(1969-08-31) (aged 48)
Round Hill, Virginia
Political party Republican
Alma mater Muskingum College
Occupation radio executive

Donald Cogley Bruce (April 27, 1921 – August 31, 1969) was a U.S. Representative from Indiana and a founder of the American Conservative Union.

Born in Troutville, Pennsylvania, Bruce graduated from high school in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and attended Muskingum College in New Concord, Ohio. He was employed in the radio broadcasting industry for twenty years, serving as program director, business manager, and general manager. In 1960 he was elected to the House as a Republican from Indiana, serving two terms before being defeated in the 1964 senatorial primary.[1]

Following the landslide defeat of Barry Goldwater in the November general election, Bruce joined with other conservatives to discuss responses to the seeming liberal triumph represented by Lyndon Johnson's reelection. This led to a subsequent meeting in December at which the nascent organization was named the American Conservative Union and Bruce was elected as its first chairman, a position he held until October of the following year. He also established Bruce Enterprises, a management and political consulting firm.

Bruce died August 31, 1969 in Round Hill, Virginia and is buried nearby.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Donald C. Bruce Finding Aid" (PDF). Indiana State Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts Division. 2015-07-31. Retrieved 2015-09-11. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph W. Barr
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Indiana's 11th congressional district

1961–1965
Succeeded by
Andrew Jacobs, Jr.