Duke University East Campus

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East Campus
Baldwin.jpg
Baldwin Auditorium on East Campus
General information
Architectural styleGeorgian architecture
LocationDuke University
North Carolina North Carolina
United States United States
Coordinates36°0′19.7755″N 78°54′53.1382″W / 36.005493194°N 78.914760611°W / 36.005493194; -78.914760611Coordinates: 36°0′19.7755″N 78°54′53.1382″W / 36.005493194°N 78.914760611°W / 36.005493194; -78.914760611
Website
https://studentaffairs.duke.edu/hdrl/housing-communities/east-campus

East Campus is part of Duke University's campus in Durham, North Carolina. East Campus, along with West Campus, make up most of Duke's main campus. The campus follows the Georgian architecture style,[1] making it distinct from West Campus. Currently, East Campus is the exclusive residential home to first-year students.[1]

History[edit]

The first history of Duke University traces back to its founding in 1838[2] in Trinity, North Carolina. Much to the dislike of the Methodist preachers, under the leadership of the college's President John F. Crowell, Washington Duke made a donation to the college large enough to build a new campus in Durham, North Carolina and move the college.[3][4]

The new campus was constructed over the course of the last decade of the nineteenth century.

Original Bell Tower (circa 1899)

In 1911, the Washington Duke Building was destroyed in a fire. The university created the buildings East Duke and West Duke (not to be confused with East Campus and West Campus) to serve as a replacement with expanded classroom and office space.[5]

In 1938, after the opening of Duke's West Campus for the then all-male undergraduate Trinity College of Arts and Sciences,[6] East Campus became the exclusive campus for Duke's Undergraduate Women's College.[7]

Unlike West Campus, where the campus is surrounded by forrest owned by the university,[8] East Campus is surrounded by private property not owned by the university. Thus, much of Duke's development, except for living spaces, has occurred on West Campus.

In 1972, as part of the merging of Duke's Women's College and Duke's Men's Trinity College, the campus became coeducational.[9] Unlike at Harvard University, where the merger between its all-female Radcliffe Collegeand all-male Harvard College took 22 years,[10] the coeducational merger between Duke's undergraduate colleges were merged in a single year.[11]

In 1997, as part of a university-wide change, East Campus became solely the housing for first-year students.[12] This decision was made so that each Duke undergraduate class would feel a sense of connectedness, and it also allows students to better understand the SLG, Greek, or Independent House groups they are eligible to join in the second semester of their first year.[13]

In 2018, Duke opened Trinity Dorm to offset the closings of the historic East and Epworth houses.[14]

First-year Housing[edit]

Unlike that of West Campus, East Campus is not organized into quadrangles, rather it has individual houses and residential halls.[15] Because East Campus is only for first-year students, the campus does not have housing for Selected Living Groups or Greek Organizations. The joining process for these organizations occurs in the spring of an undergraduate's first-year.[16]

Residence Halls[edit]

The Residence Hall concept represents the newer dormitories on East Campus. The dormitories are typically larger than their older "house" counterparts.

  • Bell Tower Residence Hall
  • Blackwell Residence Hall
  • Randolph Residence Hall
  • Gilbert-Addoms Residence Hall
  • Trinity Residence Hall

Houses[edit]

Although the "house" style dormitories are smaller and older than the newer Residence Halls on West Campus, Duke has recently renovated many of the "houses."[17]

Marketplace Dining Facility
  • Epworth House, the oldest structure still in operation at Duke University, originally opened in 1892[18]
  • Alspaugh House
  • Bassett House
  • Brown House
  • East House
  • Jarvis House
  • Pegram House
  • Southgate House
  • Wilson House

Student Union[edit]

First-year students who live on East Campus often eat at the original Trinity College Student Union (commonly called "Marketplace").[19]

Transportation[edit]

The overall shape of Duke University in Durham is bar-bell shaped, with two ends of West Campus and East Campus. Duke provides regular transportation services to connect students between the two campuses (known commonly as the "C1").[20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Campus, Duke Admissions". admissions.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  2. ^ "Duke University". library.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  3. ^ amy.mcdonald (2013-08-14). "Durham's Bid to Win Over Trinity College". library.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  4. ^ amy.mcdonald (2013-08-13). "Trinity College Moves to Durham". library.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  5. ^ "EAST DUKE BUILDING | Open Durham". www.opendurham.org. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  6. ^ "Julian Francis Abele (1881-1950), University of Pennsylvania University Archives". www.archives.upenn.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  7. ^ "Our History | Trinity College of Arts & Sciences". trinity.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  8. ^ "Duke Forest". Duke Forest. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  9. ^ "Our History | Trinity College of Arts & Sciences". trinity.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  10. ^ "Radcliffe | Harvard College". college.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  11. ^ "Duke University | university, Durham, North Carolina, United States". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  12. ^ amy.mcdonald (2014-02-27). "Epworth Residence Hall". library.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  13. ^ "How we got here: Duke housing since 1990". The Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  14. ^ "A theater, arcade and full kitchen: Duke's newest dorm is all about luxury". newsobserver. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  15. ^ amy.mcdonald (2014-02-10). "East Campus Buildings". library.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  16. ^ "Panhellenic Association Recruitment | Student Affairs". studentaffairs.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  17. ^ "Construction update: Southgate, Epworth to close for 2018-19 academic year, Crowell Quad set to re-open". The Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  18. ^ "There's no place like Epworth | Duke magazine". dukemagazine.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  19. ^ "Marketplace | Student Affairs". studentaffairs.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
  20. ^ "C1: East-West | Parking & Transportation". parking.duke.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-28.