Eichstätt Cathedral

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Eichstätt Cathedral
Cathedral of Our Lady, St Willibald and St Salvator of Horta
Eichstätt Dom
Eichstaett Cathedral.JPG
Eichstätt Cathedral
Location Eichstätt
Country Germany
Denomination Roman Catholic
History
Founded 8th century
Architecture
Status Active
Functional status Cathedral
Administration
Diocese Diocese of Eichstätt
Clergy
Bishop(s) Gregor Maria Franz Hanke

The first Roman Catholic cathedral of Our Lady and Sts. Willibald and Salvator in Eichstätt was built in the 8th century. The current building is 98 metres (322 feet) long. Together with the cloister and the mortuary, the two-aisled cathedral is regarded as one of the most important medieval monuments in Bavaria.

Bells[edit]

Eichstätt Cathedral

The cathedral has a collection of 18 bells, making it one of the churches with the most bells in Germany. The bells - distributed between the north and south tower - are not rung together, but rung in four separate groups.

Main Peal[edit]

The oldest bell in the peal is dedicated to Mary, mother of Jesus, (German: Frauenglocke) and dates from the beginning of the 14th Century. The bell named Hallerin was cast by Nuremberg master Hans Glockengießer in 1540.[1] The Magnificat bell of 1975 is also known as the Bishop's Bell German: Bistumsglocke).

Number Dedication Strike tone
(a′ = 435 Hz)
Mass
(kg, ca.)
Diameter
(mm)
Year of casting Foundry location
1 Trinity a0 +1/16 5.300 1.930 1976 Heidelberg
2 Christ, Hallerin c1 +1/16 3.800 1.775 1540 Nuremberg
3 John the Baptist d1 +1/16 2.321 1.500 1975 Heidelberg
4 Our Lady e1 +6/16 1.750 1.370 14th Century Nuremberg
5 Saint Joseph g1 +1/16 947 1.100 1975 Heidelberg
6 Magnificat, Bistumsglocke a1 +2/16 771 1.010 2002 Passau
7 Cecilia h1 +1/16 692 963 1967 Heidelberg
8 Boniface c2 +1/16 554 910 1975 Heidelberg
9 Gundekar d2 +1/16 385 800
10 Francis Xavier e2 +1/16 276 710

North Tower[edit]

Dedication Strike tone
(a′ = 435 Hz)
Mass
(kg, ca.)
Diameter
(mm)
Year of casting Foundry location
Ave Maria a1 +3/16 750 1.030 um 1500 Nuremburg
Choir c2 +3/16 500 880 16th Century
Mary d2 ±0 230 700 1671 Ingolstadt
Benedict f2 +9/16 105 560 2005 Passau

South Tower[edit]

The two bells of 1256 have a very characteristic sound, resulting from their special rib bell shape (German: Rippe). Two bells are rung for weekday vespers , one bell each for rosary devotions, and every Friday at 11 o'clock for the Passion of Christ.

Dedication Strike tone
(a′ = 435 Hz)
Mass
(kg, ca.)
Diameter
(mm)
Year of casting Foundry location
Willibald f1 +2/16 1.300 1.255 1256 Würzburg
Mary g1 +8/16 900 1.120 1299 Nuremberg
Mary as1 +6/16 550 961 1256 Würzburg

Death Bell[edit]

In the North Tower is the Death Bell (German: Sterbeglocke), known as Klag, which is only rung to commemorate the death of a member of the cathedral community. It was probably cast by Hermann Kessler at the beginning of the 14th century and has a strike tone of a″ +1/16. It weighs about 120 kilograms (260 lb) and has a diameter of 56 centimetres (22 in).

Other burials[edit]

Coordinates: 48°53′31″N 11°11′01″E / 48.89194°N 11.18361°E / 48.89194; 11.18361

References[edit]

  1. ^ Martin Seidler: Kölner Glocken und Geläute, In: Förderverein Romanische Kirchen Köln e.V. (Hrsg.): Colonia Romanica. IV. Köln 1989, S. 13.

Herzog, Erich; Neuhofer, Theodor (1965). Dom zu Eichstätt. Munich and Zurich: Schnell & Steiner.