Eimear McBride

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McBride at the 2016 Texas Book Festival.

Eimear McBride (born 1976) is an Irish novelist whose debut novel, A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing, won the inaugural Goldsmiths Prize in 2013 and the 2014 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction.[1][2] McBride was born in Liverpool in 1976 to Irish parents. The family moved back to Ireland when she was three.[3][4] She spent her childhood in Tubbercurry, Sligo, and Mayo. Then, at the age of 17, she moved to London to begin her studies at The Drama Centre.

McBride wrote A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing in just six months, but it took nine years to get it published. Galley Beggar Press of Norwich, which is where McBride now lives with her husband and daughter, finally picked it up in 2013.[5] The novel is written in a stream of consciousness style and tells the story of a young woman's complex relationship with her family.[6]

McBride's second novel The Lesser Bohemians was published on 1 September 2016.[7] McBride discussed the book on Woman's Hour on 8 September[8] and it was reviewed on BBC Radio 4's programme Saturday Review on 17 September.[9]

Published works[edit]

Awards and honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Debut novelist Eimear McBride wins £10,000 prize – London – London Evening Standard". London Evening Standard. 13 November 2013. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Maughan, Philip (13 November 2013). "Goldsmiths Prize awarded to debut novelist Eimear McBride for A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing". New Statesman. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  3. ^ BBC, Debut novelist Eimear McBride wins first Goldsmiths prize, 14 November 2013
  4. ^ Collard, David (17 June 2013). "Eimear McBride: Gob impressive | TLS". The Times Literary Supplement. News UK. Retrieved 14 November 2013. 
  5. ^ Sinead Gleeson, Eimear McBride: ‘I really didn’t want to write about this’, 1 October 2013, Irish Times
  6. ^ Goldsmiths Prize, About Eimear McBride, 2013
  7. ^ McBride, Eimear (1 September 2016). The Lesser Bohemians. Faber and Faber. ISBN 978-0571327850. 
  8. ^ Presenter: Jenni Murray, Producer: Emma Wallace (8 September 2016). "Olympic boxer Nicola Adams, Novelist Eimear McBride". Woman's Hour. 33:15 minutes in. BBC. BBC Radio 4. 
  9. ^ Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe, Producer: Oliver Jones (17 September 2016). "BBC-TV Presents: ... Hunt for The Wilderpeople, Eimear McBride, Bedlam, National Treasure, Dr Faustus". Saturday Review. 12:10 minutes in. BBC. BBC Radio 4. 
  10. ^ Beth Webb (November 21, 2014). "Eimear McBride wins the 2013 Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize". The Daily Telegraph. 
  11. ^ "The 2014 Folio Prize Shortlist is Announced". Folio Prize. 10 February 2014. Retrieved 13 February 2014. 
  12. ^ Gaby Wood (10 February 2014). "Folio Prize 2013: The Americans are coming, but not the ones we were expecting". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 13 February 2014. 
  13. ^ Mark Brown (7 April 2014). "Donna Tartt heads Baileys women's prize for fiction 2014 shortlist". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  14. ^ Ron Charles (4 June 2014). "Debut Irish novelist wins Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction". Washington Post. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  15. ^ Martin Doyle (28 May 2014). "Eimear McBride wins €15,000 Kerry Group Irish novel of the year award". The Irish Times. Retrieved 29 May 2014. 
  16. ^ "The 2014 Prize". The Desmond Elliott Prize. 3 July 2014. Retrieved 19 July 2014. 
  17. ^ Morgan, Tom (28 September 2016). "Goldsmiths Prize 2016 shortlist - six works of fiction at its most novel". Goldsmiths, University of London. Retrieved 29 September 2016. 
  18. ^ Flood, Alison (28 September 2016). "Goldsmiths prize shortlists novels 'that break the mould'". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 29 September 2016. 

External links[edit]