Goldsmiths Prize

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The Goldsmiths Prize is a British literary award founded in 2013. It is for fiction that "opens up new possibilities for the novel form".[1] It is sponsored by Goldsmiths, University of London in association with the New Statesman and has a £10,000 remuneration.[2] The award is limited to UK and Irish authors and books must be published by a UK-based publisher. [3]

Winners and shortlists[edit]

Blue Ribbon (Blue ribbon) = winner

2013[edit]

The shortlist for the 2013 award was announced on 1 October 2013.[4][5]

2014[edit]

The shortlist for the 2014 award was announced on 1 October 2014.[8] The winner was announced 13 November 2014.[9]

2015[edit]

The shortlist for the 2015 award was announced on 1 October 2015.[10] The winner was announced on 11 November 2015.[11]

2016[edit]

The shortlist for the 2016 award was announced on 28 September 2016.[12] The winner was announced on 9 November 2016.[13]

2017[edit]

The shortlist for the 2017 award was announced on 27 September 2017.[14] The winner was announced on 15 November 2017.[15]

2018[edit]

The shortlist for the 2018 award was announced on 26 September 2018.[16] The winner was announced on 14 November 2018.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joshua Farrington (January 23, 2013). "Goldsmiths launches £10,000 literary prize". The Bookseller. Retrieved January 24, 2013.
  2. ^ Alex Peake-Tomkinson (January 23, 2013). "Goldsmiths launch £10,000 literature prize". The Telegraph. Retrieved January 24, 2013.
  3. ^ Staff writer (January 24, 2013). "The Goldsmiths Prize". complete review. Retrieved January 24, 2013.
  4. ^ "Jim Crace makes Goldsmiths Prize shortlist". BBC news. 1 October 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013.
  5. ^ "Shortlist 2013". Goldsmiths Prize. 1 October 2013. Archived from the original on 5 October 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013.
  6. ^ "Debut novelist Eimear McBride wins £10,000 prize". London Evening Standard. 13 November 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  7. ^ "Eimear McBride wins inaugural Goldsmiths Prize for boldly original fiction". Goldsmith Prize website. 13 November 2013. Archived from the original on 16 November 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  8. ^ "New Statesman | The shortlist for the 2014 Goldsmiths Prize has been announced". New Statesman. 1 October 2014. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  9. ^ "Ali Smith wins Goldsmiths Prize for How to be Both". BBC News. 13 November 2014. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  10. ^ Morgan, Tom (1 October 2015). "Goldsmiths Prize shortlist 2015". Goldsmiths. Retrieved 19 October 2015.
  11. ^ Flood, Alison (11 November 2015). "Novel about John Lennon and primal screaming wins Goldsmiths prize". The Guardian. Retrieved 13 November 2015.
  12. ^ Morgan, Tom (28 September 2016). "Goldsmiths Prize 2016 shortlist - six works of fiction at its most novel". Goldsmiths, University of London. Retrieved 29 September 2016.
  13. ^ Armitstead, Claire (9 November 2016). "Single sentence novel wins Goldsmiths prize for books that 'break the mould'". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 November 2016.
  14. ^ Tom Gatti (2 November 2017). "The Back Half: Goldsmiths Prize Shortlist Special". New Statesman. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  15. ^ Laura Harding (15 November 2017). "Illuminated manuscript novel wins Goldsmiths Prize". Independent. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  16. ^ Adam Mars-Jones (26 September 2018). "Novel senses of new: the 2018 Goldsmiths prize for fiction shortlist". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  17. ^ Alison Flood (14 November 2018). "Robin Robertson wins Goldsmiths prize for innovative fiction with The Long Take". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 November 2018.

External links[edit]