Florence Carlyle

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Florence Carlyle
Photo of Florence Carlyle.jpg
Florence Carlyle, c. 1890.
Born 1864 (1864)
Ontario, Canada
Died May 2, 1923(1923-05-02) (aged 58–59)
Crowborough, England
Nationality Canadian
Known for Painting
Partner(s) Juliet Hastings[1]

Florence Emily Carlyle (September 24, 1864 – May 2, 1923) was a Canadian figure and portrait painter in the modernist style, known especially as a colorist.

Childhood[edit]

Florence Carlyle was born September, 24 1864 in Galt, Ontario,[1] to parents Emily Yoummans Carlyle and William Carlyle.[2]The second eldest of seven children, Florence was known throughout her life as "Bird" by family and friends.[3] In 1871 the Carlyle family moved to Woodstock, Ontario, where her father, William Carlyle,[4] worked as the county inspector of schools for Oxford County.[5] While living in Woodstock, Emily created an art studio for local children who were interested in developing their artistic skills under the guidance of hired artists.[6] Sensing her daughter's artistic talent, Emily arranged for Florence to have private drawing and painting lessons with William Lees Judson.[7] William's uncle (and Florence's great-uncle) was the Scottish historian and philosopher Thomas Carlyle;[8] and William was said by a contemporary writer to have inherited "much of the cleverness and the abstraction" of his celebrated forebear.[3]

Early Adulthood[edit]

In 1883 Florence and her younger sister, Lilian, exhibited several of their works at the Ladies Department of the Toronto Industrial Exhibition.[9] It was this exhibition that gave Florence widespread recognition as Princes Louise and her husband, the Marquis of Lorne purchased one of her paintings of white lilies on china.[10] This event was heavily covered by The Globe, Daily Mail, and Woodstock's paper at the time.[11]

Education while in Paris[edit]

After realizing that she needed to go abroad to further develop her artistic skill, 26 year old Carlyle moved to Paris, France November 3, 1890.[12] Carlyle journeyed to Paris with her artistic mentor, Paul Peel, his sister Margaret Peel, and their father John PeelIn, however once in Paris she rented a flat on her own.[12] Upon first arriving in Paris, Carlyle found it difficult to find an artistic academy that admitted women and furthermore, did not segregate men and women in classes.[13] At first Carlyle attended Académie Julian, but after a disagreement with Adolphe-William Bouguerae she switched to the less prestigious Académie Delécluse.[14] By 1892 Carlyle would return to Académie Julian to finish her studies.[14] In 1893 she exhibited her painting Une Dame Hollandaise at the Salon of the Société des Artistes Français, where it "received favourable attention."[15] Carlyle returned to Woodstock, where her family still resided in 1896.[16]

Later Years[edit]

She had studios in London and Woodstock, and in 1897 became the first woman to be elected an Associate of the Royal Canadian Academy. In 1899, she established a studio in New York City. [17]

The last twenty years of her life were spent in Crowborough, Sussex, England where she and a friend, Julie Hastings, bought an English cottage they called "Sweet Haws".

Florence Carlyle died at Crowborough in the spring of 1923. Most of her work is in the collection of the Woodstock Art Gallery in Woodstock, Ontario.

Selected Works[edit]

La Vieille Victorine

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b McGirr, Katelyn. "Florence Carlyle An Artist Biography". RiverBrink Art Museum Blog. Retrieved 29 July 2017.
  2. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. pp. 9–11. ISBN 9780773535091.
  3. ^ a b Murray, p. 19.
  4. ^ Murray, Joan, and Florence Carlyle. Florence Carlyle, 1864-1923: Against All Odds. London, Ont.: Museum London, 2004. p. 19. ISBN 1-895800-96-X
  5. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 11. ISBN 9780773535091.
  6. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 13. ISBN 9780773535091.
  7. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 13. ISBN 9780773535091.
  8. ^ Campbell, Claire (Spring 2010). "Review of The Practice of Her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism" (PDF). Journal of Historical Biography. 7: 182–185.
  9. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of Her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 22. ISBN 9780773535091.
  10. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of Her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queens University Press. p. 23. ISBN 9780773535091.
  11. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of Her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queens University Press. p. 23. ISBN 9780773535091.
  12. ^ a b Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 36. ISBN 9780773535091.
  13. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 42. ISBN 9780773535091.
  14. ^ a b Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of Her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 43. ISBN 9780773535091.
  15. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of Her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. pp. 54–56. ISBN 9780773535091.
  16. ^ Butlin, Susan (2009). The Practice of her Profession: Florence Carlyle, Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press. p. 69. ISBN 9780773535091.
  17. ^ Farr, Dorothy; Luckyj, Natalie (1975). From Women's Eyes: Women Painters in Canada. Kingston: Agnes Etherington Art Centre. p. 26.

External links[edit]