Fred Brinkman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Fred Brinkman
Born (1892-11-23)November 23, 1892
Spokane, Washington
Died October 8, 1961(1961-10-08) (aged 68)
Flathead County, Montana
Nationality American
Occupation Architect
Buildings Anderson Style Shop, Charles Boles House, Brice Apartments, City Water Department, Cornelius Hedges Elementary School, and Russell School
Projects Several buildings at Montana State University

Frederick Adolph Brinkman (November 23, 1892 – October 8, 1961) was an American architect based in Kalispell, Montana, and Brinkman and Lenon is a partnership in which he worked. More than a dozen of Brinkman's extant works in and around Kalispell have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including the Anderson Style Shop, Charles Boles House, Brice Apartments, City Water Department, Cornelius Hedges Elementary School, Russell School, Linderman School, the Montgomery Ward Store in Kalispell, and the O'Neil Print Shop.

Early years[edit]

Brinkman was born in Spokane, Washington in November 1892.[1] His father, Gustave A. Brinkman, emigrated from Germany in 1880 and worked as a carpenter. His mother, Amalia (Wagenknecht) Brinkman, emigrated from Germany in 1881. His family moved to Montana while Brinkman was still an infant.[2] Brinkman's father developed a reputation as a master carpenter and cabinetmaker and was reported to have built the first house in Kalispell.[2] At the time of the 1900 United States Census, the family remained in Kalispell.[3] Brinkman also had two younger brothers, Charles E. (born November 1894 in Montana) and Conrad W. (born June 1897 in Montana).[3] The family continued to reside in Kalispell at the time of the 1910 United States Census.[4] Brinkman attended Flathead High School as part of the Class of 1912.[5]

Education and early career[edit]

Brinkman attended the University of Wisconsin from 1912 to 1913 and the University of Michigan from 1913 to 1916.[6] He received a Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree from the University of Michigan College of Engineering in 1916.[7] While attending Michigan, he was a member of Tau Sigma Delta and won the AIA Scholastic Medal.[6] In 1916, he began working as an architectural draftsman for Louis Kamper, one of the leading architects of the time in Detroit, Michigan.[6] In a June 1917 draft registration card, Brinkman wrote that he was living in Detroit and was employed as an architect by Kamper.[8] During World War I, he worked on the Panama Canal as a civil service architect while serving as a lieutenant in the Army Engineers, which he left in 1919.

Architectural career in Montana[edit]

After being discharged from the military, Brinkman returned to Montana. From 1920 to 1922, he was employed as a draftsman by McIver & Cohagen in Billings, Montana.[6] At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Brinkman was living in Billings and working in an architect's office.[9] He was married to Aral Jean Linthacum in December 1920 at Billings. At the time of the 1930 United States Census, Brinkman was living in Kalispell, Montana, with his wife, Aral, and their daughter, Rosalie Brinkman (born c. 1923).[10] He was in practice by himself from 1922 to 1946, at which time he went into partnership with Percy H. Lenon. He was a member of the Kiwanis, Elks, and Freemasons.[6]

Brinkman worked as an architect in Kalispell for nearly 40 years. In the book, "A Guide to Historic Kalispell," Kathryn L. McKay wrote that Brinkman "influenced the physical appearance of his hometown more than any other single person," creating buildings "in virtually all architectural style popular from the 1920s to the 1950s."[11] More than a dozen of Brinkman's extant works in and around Kalispell, Montana have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including the Anderson Style Shop, Charles Boles House, Brice Apartments, City Water Department, Cornelius Hedges Elementary School, and Russell School.[12]

Brinkman designed several buildings at Montana State University, including the Business Administration Building, the Student Union, the Men's Dormitory, and Field House. He was also a lecturer at Montana State.[6] He also designed the Administration Building at North Montana College.[6]

Brinkman died in Flathead County, Montana, in October 1961.[13]

Selected works[edit]

Kalispell[edit]

  • Anderson Style Shop, 222 Main St., Kalispell, MT, built in 1941 with Art Nouveau features, NRHP-listed[2][12][14]
  • Charles Boles House, 40 Appleway Dr., Kalispell, MT, three buildings designed by Brinkman and built in 1932, NRHP-listed.[15]
  • Brice Apartments, 228 2nd Ave. East, Kalispell, MT, built in 1936, designed by architects B. Brice Gilliland and Fred Brinkman, NRHP-listed[12][16]
  • Brinkman designed Kalispell's City Water Department building.
    City Water Department, 336 First Ave. E., Kalispell, MT, a Georgian Revival structure built in 1927, currently operated as a municipal courthouse, NRHP-listed[12][17][18]
  • Cornelius Hedges Elementary School, also known as Southside School, 827 4th Ave. East, Kalispell, MT, built in 1929, NRHP-listed[2][12][19]
  • Contributing works in the NRHP-listed Courthouse Historic District, Kalispell, MT, including the Buck / Robbin House (725 S. Main Street) and the First Presbyterian Church (524 Main Street).[12][20]
  • Several contributing works in the NRHP-listed East Side Historic District, Kalispell, MT, including the Dean Rental Property (919 5th Ave E.), Driscoll House (515 3rd St E.), and Linderman School (124 3rd Avenue East).[12][19]
  • Russell School, 227 W. Nevada St., Kalispell, MT, built in 1939, NRHP-listed[12][21]
  • Several contributing works in NRHP-listed West Side Historic District, Kalispell, MT, including Pearce House (132 8th St. West) and Elmer Sonstelie Residence (640 2nd Ave. W.).[12][22]
  • Kalispell General Hospital, four-story addition in 1948.[23]
  • Brinkman House, 700 First Avenue East, Kalispell, MT, a 1936 Tudor home designed by Brinkman as a showcase of his skills[24]
  • City Service Station, 401 1st Avenue East, Kalispell, MT, built in 1931, currently used by KCFW Television.[18]
  • Montgomery Ward Store, 333 Main Street, Kalispell, MT, built 1929, currently used by Alpine Lighting, part of the NRHP-listed Kalispell Main Street Historic District.[18][25]
  • O'Neil Print Shop, 323 Main Street, Kalispell, MT, built in 1926 in the Western Commercial style, currently used by Trippet's Printing, part of the NRHP-listed Kalispell Main Street Historic District.[2][18]
  • Ross Medical Clinic, 221 First Avenue East, Kalispell, MT, built in 1939, currently used by attorneys Johnson, Berg, McEvoy & Bostock.[18]
  • Halliday-Boysen Block, 110 Main Street, Kalispell, MT, built in 1928 in the Western Commercial Style, part of the NRHP-listed Kalispell Main Street Historic District.[2]
  • The new Flathead County High School, Kalispell, MT.[2]
  • Trinity Lutheran Church of Kalispell.[2]
  • Church of Christ Scientist, Kalispell, MT.[2]

Outside Kalispell[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fred. A. Brinkman". The AIA Historical Directory of American Architects. American Institute of Architects. Retrieved 2011-06-10.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form for the Kalispell Main Street Historic District Addendum and Boundary Increase". Montana Memory Project. pp. 39–40. (biographical information on Brinkman)
  3. ^ a b Census entry for Gustave Brinkman and family. Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Kalispell, Flathead, Montana; Roll: T623_911; Page: 15B; Enumeration District: 35.
  4. ^ Census entry for Gustave A. Brinkman and family. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Kalispell, Flathead, Montana; Roll: T624_832; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0030; Image: 403; FHL Number: 1374845.
  5. ^ "Local". The Kalispell Journal. February 8, 1912.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g American Architects Directory (PDF) (First edition, 1956 ed.). R.R. Bowker. 1955. p. 63. Retrieved 2011-06-10.
  7. ^ Catalogue of the University of Michigan 1916-1917. University of Michigan. 1917. p. 514.
  8. ^ Draft Registration Card for Fred Adolph Brinkman, born November 23, 1892, in Spokane, Washington. Ancestry.com. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Registration Location: Wayne County, Michigan; Roll: 2023956; Draft Board: 5.
  9. ^ Census entry for Fred A. Brinkman, age 27, born in Washington, son of German immigrants. Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Billings Ward 2, Yellowstone, Montana; Roll: T625_978; Page: B; Enumeration District: 164; Image: 741.
  10. ^ Census entry for Fred Brinkman, age 36, architect, born in Washington, son of German immigrants. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Kalispell, Flathead, Montana; Roll: 1256; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 13; Image: 205.0.
  11. ^ Kathryn L. McKay (2001). A Guide to Historic Kalispell. Montana Historical Society. p. 28. ISBN 9780917298707.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  13. ^ Montana State Genealogical Society and Ancestry.com. Montana Death Index, 1860-2007 [database on-line].
  14. ^ "Anderson Style Shop". Archiplanet.org.
  15. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form for Residence for Charles Boles". Montana Memory Project.
  16. ^ "Brice Apartments". waymarking.com.
  17. ^ McKay, A Guide to Historic Kalispell, p. 29.
  18. ^ a b c d e "Historical Walking Tours of Kalispell, Montana" (PDF). Montana Historical Society. 2009.
  19. ^ a b "Kalispell East Side - Contributing Properties". Montana History Wiki.
  20. ^ "Kalispell Courthouse Historic District - Contributing Properties". Montana Historical Wiki.
  21. ^ "National Register - Flathead County". Montana History Wiki.
  22. ^ "Kalispell West Side Historic District - Contributing Properties". Montana History Wiki.
  23. ^ "Hospital Work Makes Progress". The Spokesman-Review. July 31, 1948.
  24. ^ McKay, A Guide To Historic Kalispell, p. 52.
  25. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form for the Kalispell Main Street Historic District Addendum and Boundary Increase". Montana Memory Project.
  26. ^ Hipolito Rafael Chacon (Autumn 2001). "Creating a Mythic Past: Spanish-style Architecture in Montana". Montana: The Magazine of Western History, vol. 51. pp. 46–60.