GDiesel

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GDiesel is a 100% drop-in alternative Diesel fuel that is manufactured by Reno, Nevada-based Advanced Refining Concepts (ARC).[1] This new type of Diesel results from an innovative way of combining conventional ultra-low-sulfur Diesel and natural gas — hence the "G" in the name. It burns far cleaner and significantly improves performance, delivering 10 percent or better improvement in fuel economy, depending on the application.

The inventor of GDiesel® is Dr. Rudolf W. Gunnerman,[2] who has a 40-year background in the development and marketing of energy- and fuel-related technologies. His last venture, Sulfco, which provided an ultrasound and hydrogen peroxide for efficient desulfurization and also promised cheaper fuel, wound up bankrupt after many years of positive press releases that success was just around the corner. His son Peter is the partner and director of Advanced Refining Concepts. The firm's ClearRefining® process is relatively simple, beginning with the standard ultra-low sulfur Diesel fuel that one would buy at any filling station. This feedstock is first pressurized in a steel tank to less than 10 pounds per square inch (69 kPa) and heated to about 250° F, much lower levels than those required during typical refinery processes. Natural gas, the same material used for cooking and heating, is piped into the tank of Diesel fuel, and the resulting mixture then swirls up and through a wheel-shaped filter wrapped with four different metal catalysts — cobalt, among others.

In August 2010, GDiesel received formal certification as an “alternative fuel” from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.[3][4]

The fuel is produced at the company’s McCarran, Nevada,[5] facility in which natural gas is combined with standard Diesel fuel and is then circulated through four different metal catalysts.[6]

Previously, the fuel was featured in publications such as Diesel World and Motor Trend.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Corporate website
  2. ^ Honorary doctorate only
  3. ^ Nevada OKs natural gas-diesel alt fuel combination Associated Press.
  4. ^ Nevada Government Documents
  5. ^ McCarran, Nevada is a census-designated place (CDP) about 13 km east of Sparks, Nevada, along Interstate 80, ZIP code 89434.
  6. ^ Corporate website
  • “Notice of Proposed Action”. Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. 2010-06-16.
  • Steve Temple (April 2010). "The Next Generation of Diesel Fuel?" (PDF). Diesel World: 86–92. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-07. 
  • “In Brief”. Las Vegas Review-Journal. 2010-09-24.

External links[edit]