Geoff Simpson

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Geoff Simpson
Member of the Washington House of Representatives
from the 47th district
In office
2001 – 2010[1]
Preceded by Phil Fortunato
Succeeded by Mark Hargrove
Personal details
Born Washington
Political party Democratic
Residence Covington, Washington, Issaquah, Washington, Kent, WA
Alma mater Saint Louis School (Honolulu, HI)
Occupation firefighter, small business owner
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Navy
Years of service 1981-1986
Rank E-5

Geoffrey H. "Geoff" Simpson served as a Democratic member of the Washington House of Representatives from the 47th district. Prior to his election in 2000, Simpson served as a member of the City Council of Covington, Washington and as Mayor Pro Tempore.[2]

Political career[edit]

Simpson is a member of the Transportation Committee, the Insurance, Financial Services, and Consumer Protection Committee, and the Local Government Committee, where he serves as chairman.[3]

Simpson’s legislative career has focused on several key issues and problems. The second bill Simpson introduced after being elected to the state legislature was to equalize the penalty for hit-and-run death with the penalty for vehicular homicide involving alcohol. [4] Simpson's inspiration for the legislation came from a first-hand experience as a Kent firefighter when he was dispatched to the scene of a hit-and-run that resulted in the death of Carol Thueringer. [5] Simpson also sponsored HB 2713 which expanded the state database of DNA samples from criminals primarily convicted of sex-related offenses.

In the wake of reports of price gouging by various merchants around the state of Washington after the September 11, 2001 attack on America, Simpson introduced legislation to protect consumers from the practice.[6] In January 2003, Rep. Simpson introduced legislation to regulate the practice referred to as "dead peasants insurance" whereby corporations purchased life insurance on employees without that employee’s knowledge or consent.[7]

On January 19, 2004, Simpson introduced HB 2660 which was signed into law and required a DUI offender to install an ignition interlock device as a condition of restoration of their driving rights.[8] The legislation was hailed by Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) as the first of its kind in the nation.[9]

In February 2005, Simpson introduced a bill that passed the Washington State House focused on offering financial incentives for state employees who choose to purchase prescription drugs from Canada. The bill authorized state agencies to buy prescription drugs directly from Canada pending FDA approval. Governor Gary Locke created a Washington State website to assist residents in purchasing drugs from Canada.[10] [11]

In the 2006 legislative session Simpson supported HB 2292, which regulated medical malpractice by focusing on patient safety, insurance industry reform, and health care liability reform by reducing cost of dispute resolution without infringing on fundamental rights of individuals.[12]

In the 2010 legislative session, Simpson was the prime sponsor for HB’s 2830 and 2831 which increased regulatory tools for the Department of Financial Institutions to intervene when financial institutions were in financial trouble. The legislation increases the Department’s ability to suspend officers who commit fraud and the ability to impose civil fines on law-breakers.[13] Simpson also sponsored HB 2739 in the 2010 session,[14] the House companion of a new law to increase the safety of children in school crosswalk zones by allowing crossing guards to report vehicles driving dangerously to police who can issue double fines after investigation.[15]

Associations and Endorsements[edit]

In 2003 Simpson was declared Legislator of the Year by the Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs.[16]

In May 2006, Simpson was awarded the 2006 Community Champion Award from Futurewise.[17]

In 2008, Simpson was endorsed by the Sierra Club for his work on the House Transportation Committee.[18]

Personal life[edit]

Prior to elective office, Simpson served in the United States Navy and as a Boeing firefighter for 5 years. He has been a firefighter for the Kent, Washington Fire Department since September 1990 and is the former owner of a small business.[2] He attended Bellevue Community College, Edmonds Community College, and Highline Community College.[2] He was named a "Certified Municipal Leader" by the Association of Washington Cities in 2000.[19] He has three children.

In October 2003, Simpson was dispatched to the scene of a murder where at least one victim was identified and a severely wounded 7 year old girl was found. Simpson and three other fire fighters entered the scene without police backup to rescue the girl and provide medical assistance. The four fire fighters were honored for their heroism with departmental Distinguished Service Awards.[20]

Domestic violence[edit]

On April 27, 2008, Simpson was arrested and charged in King County District Court with fourth-degree assault and interfering with a domestic violence report after an alleged altercation with his ex-wife.[21] Simpson immediately declared the charges "unwarranted" and predicted his exoneration.[21][22][23] On May 28, 2008, the prosecutor in the case dropped the charges against Simpson, saying that he "no longer believes there is sufficient evidence to proceed with the charges."[24]

On July 9, 2010 the Seattle City Attorney's office charged Rep. Simpson with one count of assault stemming from an alleged incident of domestic violence at Seattle Children's Hospital on May 22, 2010. According to news sources, "A social worker told police she saw Simpson “barrel” into the room, push the former wife and shut the door. He 'closed the blinds and barricaded himself inside using his body' and was yelling inside, according to the report. Once he came out, he left the property, witnesses said."[25]

Electoral history[edit]

Washington House of Representatives, 47th District
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct Libertarian Votes Pct
2000[26] Geoffrey Simpson 21,989 50.15% Phil Fortunato 21,856 49.85%
2002[27] Geoffrey Simpson 16,666 51.55% Phil Fortunato 15,665 48.45%
2004[28] Geoffrey Simpson 26,152 51.79% Steve Altick 23,396 46.33% Duane Grindstaff 952 1.89%
2006[29] Geoffrey Simpson 22,210 59.66% Donna Watts 15,016 40.34%
2008[30] Geoffrey Simpson 27,439 52.62% Mark Hargrove 24,707 47.38%
2010[31] Geoffrey Simpson 19,943 43.67% Mark Hargrove 25,728 56.33%

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Members of the Washington State Legislature, 1889 – 2011" (PDF). Legislative Information Center. 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 4, 2014. Retrieved October 26, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "Project Vote Smart - Representative Geoff Simpson (WA)". Project Vote Smart. 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  3. ^ "Simpson". Washington State Legislature. 2010. Archived from the original on April 7, 2010. Retrieved April 5, 2010. 
  4. ^ "HB 1280 - 2001 - 02". Washington State Legislature. February 2001. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  5. ^ Cook, Rebecca (April 14, 2001). "Tougher penalties for hit-and-runs". Seattle Times. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  6. ^ "HB 2419 - 2001-02". Washington State Legislature. February 2001. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  7. ^ "HB 1230 - 2003-04". Washington State Legislature. April 2003. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  8. ^ "HB 2660 - 2003-04". Washington State Legislature. April 2003. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  9. ^ Youngers, Peter P. (June 10, 2004). "Changes in DUI laws keep us safer". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  10. ^ Peryea, Allison (January 31, 2004). "Bill looks to Canada for cheaper prescriptions". Seattle Times. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Office of the Governor". Digital Archives. October 26, 2004. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  12. ^ "HB 2292 - 2005-06". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. June 2005. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  13. ^ "Bill Summary". Washington State Legislature. January 2010. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  14. ^ "HB 2739 - 2009-10". Washington State Legislature. January 2010. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  15. ^ "School crosswalk safety gets significant early support". Public School Employees of Washington. January 2010. Archived from the original on July 27, 2011. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Truly "dirty" GOP Tricks: Nothing New". Washblog. January 23, 2006. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Futurewise presents 2006 Community Champion Award" (PDF). Futurewise. 2006. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Geoff Simpson: State Representative #1, District 47 – Cascade Chapter". Sierra Club. August 1, 2006. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  19. ^ Washington House Democrats. "Biography". Rep. Geoff Simpson: 47th District. Archived from the original on August 7, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  20. ^ "kingcountyjournal.com". kingcountyjournal.com. April 14, 2004. Archived from the original on June 18, 2004. Retrieved April 6, 2010. 
  21. ^ a b "WA lawmaker charged with assault". Seattle Times. April 30, 2008. Archived from the original on October 28, 2008. Retrieved September 13, 2008. 
  22. ^ Heffner, Emily (May 1, 2008). "Official faces domestic-assault charge". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on October 28, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  23. ^ Associated Press (April 30, 2008). "State lawmaker charged with assault". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Archived from the original on October 28, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  24. ^ The Associated Press (June 1, 2008). "Domestic violence charges against legislator dropped". The Daily Herald (Everett, Washington). Archived from the original on October 28, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  25. ^ "Rep. Simpson facing criminal charge for hospital confrontation". The Daily Herald. July 9, 2010. Retrieved July 9, 2010. 
  26. ^ "November 2000 General". Elections Search - Results. Washington Secretary of State. Archived from the original on October 28, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  27. ^ "November 2002 General". Elections Search - Results. Washington Secretary of State. Archived from the original on October 28, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  28. ^ "2004 General Election". Elections Search - Results. Washington Secretary of State. Archived from the original on October 28, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  29. ^ "2006 General Election Results". Elections Search - Results. Washington Secretary of State. Archived from the original on October 30, 2008. Retrieved October 27, 2008. 
  30. ^ "2008 General Election Results". Elections Search - Results. Washington Secretary of State. Archived from the original on March 26, 2010. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  31. ^ "2010 General Election Results". Elections Search - Results. Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved November 2, 2012. 

External links[edit]