George Scott-Chad

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

George Scott-Chad
Personal information
Full nameGeorge Norman Scott-Chad
Born1 November 1899
Kensington, London, England
Died4 July 1950(1950-07-04) (aged 50)
Paddington, London, England
BattingRight-handed
BowlingUnknown
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
1920–1932Norfolk
Career statistics
Competition First-class
Matches 3
Runs scored 49
Batting average 9.80
100s/50s –/–
Top score 24
Balls bowled 438
Wickets 6
Bowling average 35.50
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling 2/43
Catches/stumpings 4/–
Source: Cricinfo, 16 April 2019

George Norman Scott-Chad (1 November 1899 – 4 July 1950) was an English first-class cricketer and British Army officer. Scott-Chad served with both the Coldstream Guards and the Royal Norfolk Regiment, in a military career which spanned nearly thirty years. He also played first-class cricket for the British Army cricket team and served as the High Sheriff of Norfolk.

Life and military career[edit]

The son of the footballer and barrister Charles Scott-Chad, he was born at Kensington and educated at Eton College.[1][2] From Eton he attended the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, graduating as a second lieutenant into the Coldstream Guards in December 1919.[3] He made his debut in minor counties cricket for Norfolk in the 1920 Minor Counties Championship.[4] He made his debut in first-class cricket for the British Army cricket team against Oxford University at Oxford in 1923.[5] He made a further two first-class appearances for the Army in 1924,[5] playing against Cambridge University and Oxford University.[5] In his three first-class matches, Scott-Chad scored 49 runs with a high score of 24.[6] As a bowler, he took 6 wickets at an average of 35.50, with best figures of 2 for 43.[7] He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in August 1929.[8] He retired from the Coldstream Guards in May 1930, upon which he received a gratuity.[9] He toured the West Indies with Lord Tennyson's XI in February/March 1932, but did not feature in any of the three first-class fixtures on the tour.[2] Later that same year he played his final minor counties match for Norfolk, having made a total of 40 appearances in the Minor Counties Championship since his debut in 1920.[4]

He later returned to military service with the Royal Norfolk Regiment, with promotion to the rank of captain in December 1936.[10] He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel in June 1939.[11] After serving in the Second World War, he was nominated for role of High Sheriff of Norfolk in November 1947, alongside Ion Benn and Sir Edmund Bacon.[12] He was successful in his nomination and served as High Sheriff in 1948.[13] Besides cricket, he was also a skilled racquets and squash racquets player who won the army championship five times in succession and retired from military service unbeaten.[2] Scott-Chad died at St Mary's Hospital in Paddington in July 1950.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eton College Chronicle. Spottiswoode. 1911. p. 353.
  2. ^ a b c d "Wisden - Obituaries in 1950". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  3. ^ "No. 31701". The London Gazette (Supplement). 20 December 1919. p. 15834.
  4. ^ a b "Minor Counties Championship Matches played by George Scott-Chad". CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "First-Class Matches played by George Scott-Chad". CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  6. ^ "First-class Batting and Fielding For Each Team by George Scott-Chad". CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  7. ^ "First-class Bowling For Each Team by George Scott-Chad". CricketArchive. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  8. ^ "No. 33526". The London Gazette. 16 August 1929. p. 5338.
  9. ^ "No. 33609". The London Gazette. 27 March 1930. p. 3327.
  10. ^ "No. 34355". The London Gazette. 29 December 1936. p. 8439.
  11. ^ "No. 34631". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2 June 1939. p. 3709.
  12. ^ "No. 38126". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 November 1947. p. 5440.
  13. ^ "No. 38235". The London Gazette (Supplement). 12 March 1948. p. 1811.

External links[edit]